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Full text of "Bulletin : Lambuth College, Jackson, Tennessee, Twenty-second Annual Catalogue 1945-1946 [and] Announcements 1946-1947"

LAMBUTH 

COLLEGE 




BULLETIN 



Twenty-second Annual Catalogue 

1945-1946 



Announcements 

1946-1947 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://archive.org/details/bulletinlambuth194546unse 



^BULLETIN 

LAMBUTH COLLEGE 

JACKSON, TENNESSEE 




TWENTY-SECOND ANNUAL CATALOGUE 

1945-1946 

ANNOUNCEMENTS 
1946-1947 



VOLUME XXII NUMBER 3 

Entered as Second Class Matter Feb. 21, 1928, at postoffice, 
Jackson, Tenn., under Act of August 12, 1912. 



COLLEGE CALENDAR 

Summer Quarter, 1946 

June 11 Summer quarter begins 

July 4 Holiday 

July 17 Second term begins 

August 20 Summer quarter ends 

Regular Session, 1946-47 

September 18, 1 :00 P.M Freshman Begistration 

September 19, 10 :00 A.M Formal Opening 

September 19, 1 :00 P.M Registration, upperclassmen 

September 20, 8 :00 A.M Class work begins 

\September 26 Last day for full registration 

October 3 Last day for 12 hours registration 

November 1 Second term fall quarter begins 

November 28-December 1 Thanksgiving holidays 

December 18, 3:05 P.M Fall quarter ends 

December 19-January 1, inclusive Christmas holidays 

January 2, 8:00 A.M "Winter quarter begins 

February 10 Second term begins 

March 20, 3 :05 P.M Winter quarter ends 

March 21-23, inclusive Spring holidays 

March 24, 8 :00 A.M Spring quarter begins 

May 1 Second term begins 

June 7 Spring quarter ends 

June 8 Commencement Day 



CALENDAR 
1946-1947 



S M T W T F S 
12 3 
"4 ~5 ~6 ~7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


SEPTEMBER 

S M T W T F S 
12 3 4 5 6 7 
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 
15 16 17 18 19 20 21 
22 23 24 25 26 27 28 
29 30 


OCTOBER 

5 M T W T F S 
12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 31 


NbVE'MB'ER 
S M T W T F S 
_ _ 1 2 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 




DECEMBER 

S M T W T F S 
12 3 4 5 6 7 
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 
15 16 17 18 19 20 21 
22 23 24 25 26 27 28 
28 30 31 _ 


JANUARY 

S M T W T F S 
12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 31 _. 


FEBRUARY 
S M T W T F S 
. 1 


MARCH 
S M T W T F S 
1 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 __ 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 31 


APRIL 

,S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 6 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
/3 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 


MAY 

S M T W T F S 
12 3 
~4 ~6 "6 ~7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


JUNE 

S M T W T F S 
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 
15 16 17 18 19 20 21 
22 23 24 25 26 27 28 
29 30 _ __ _ _ __ 


JULY 

5 M T W T F S 
12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 31 





TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

College Calendar 2 

Board of Trustees 5 

Faculty 6, 7, 8 

Officers of Administration 9 

Committees of Faculty 9 

History 10 

Aims 10, 1 

Location 1 

Buildings 1 

Campus 1 

Equipment 1 

Expenses 12 

Tuition 12 

Maintenance Fee 13 

Diploma Fee 13 

Laboratory Fees... 13, 14 

Board and Room 14, 15 

Regulations Regarding Payments 1 5 

Incidentals 15 

Summary of Expenses 15 

Self-Help 16 

Student Loan Funds 16, 17 

Scholarships 17, 18 

Awards 18, 19 

Regulations Relating to Students 19, 20 

Statement of High School Work 19 

Registration 19 

Classification of Students 20 

Admission to Advanced Standing 20 

Grading and Reports 20 

Quality Credits 20 

Maximum and Minimum Number of Hours 21 

Absence , 21 



Page 

Probation „ 21 

Participation in Student Activities 21 

Examinations 22 

Transcript of Record. .22 

Chapel Attendance 22 

Church Attendance w 22 

Boarding Places 23 

Dormitory Regulations... 23 

Discipline 23 

Athletics .....23 

Student Organizations 24, 25 

Publications . 26 

Library 26 

Laboratories 26 

Student Counseling .26 

Requirements for Admission 27 

General Requirements for Graduation .....27 

Requirements for the degree of Bachelor of Arts .27, 28 

Requirements for the degree of Bachelor of Science .28 

Teacher Training Course _.. 28, 29 

Pre-Professional Courses. 29, 30 

Departments of Instruction 31 

Biology 31 

Business Administration 32, 33, 34 

Education and Psychology... 34, 35, 36 

English 36, 37 

History ___ 37, 38 

Home Economics 38, 39 

Mathematics 39, 40 

Modern Languages 40, 41 

Music 42, 43, 44, 45, 46 

Physical Education 47 

Physical Science 47, 48 

Religion 48, 49 

Social Science 49, 50 

Speech and Dramatics 50 

Register of Students -52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57 

Alumni Directory 58, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

Class A — Terms expire 1946: F. H. Peeples, Frank B. Jones, 
Mrs. Joel M. Porter, R. E. Womack, T. H. Stokes, 
H. J. Wright, B. T. Everett. 

Class B — Terms expire 1947: C. C. Grimes, J. E. Underwood, 
E. W. Sprague, Lawrence Taylor, J. B. Summers, 
Gordon Browning. 

Class C— Terms expire 1948 : W. S. Evans, L. L. Fonville, W. 

A. Johnston, R. L. Beare, J. 0. Bomer, Mrs. Homer 
Tatum. 

Class D— Terms expire 1949: C. N. Jolley, Robert A. Clark, 

B. C. Durham, Jr., E. L. Robinson, James D. Jenkins. 

Officers of Board 

L. L. FONVILLE _ _ President 

R. L. BEARE „ _ „ _ Vice-President 

C. N. JOLLEY Secretary 

R. E. WOMACK _ Treasurer 



Executive Committee 

L. L. Fonville, R. L. Beare, E. L. Robinson, R. E. Womack, 
Lawrence Taylor. 

The Chairman of the Board of Trustees and the President 
of the College are ex-officio members of all committees. 



FACULTY 



RICHARD ELWOOD WOMACK, A.B., A.M., LL.D., President 

A.B., University of Arkansas ; A.M., Peabody College for Teachers ; gradu- 
ate study, University of Wisconsin; LL.D., Union University. 



MARVIN EDWARD EAGLE, A.B., A.M., Dean 

History 

A.B., Kentucky Wesleyan College; A.M., Vanderbilt University; graduate 

study University of Chicago, University of California, Peabody College 

for Teachers, and Oxford University; residence requirements for 

Ph.D. degree completed, University of Chicago. 



EMILY HASTINGS CLARK, A.B., A.M., 

Social Science 

A.B., Lambuth College ; A.M., Duke University. 



KATHARINE CLEMENT, A.B., A.M., 

French 

A.B., University of Tennessee; A.M., University of Colorado; 
graduate study, Peabody College. 



SARAH V. CLEMENT, A.B., A.M., 

English 

A.B., Union University; A.M., Vanderbilt University; graduate study, 
Peabody College. 



ARTHUR E. EVANS, A.B., A.M., 

Modern Languages 

A.B., Olivet College; A.M., University of Michigan; residence requirements 

for Ph.D. degree completed, University of Michigan ; advanced study, 

Mexico City; advanced study, University of Havana; Diploma 

from Institut de Phonetique, Sorbonne, Paris. 



BLANCHE ROUSSEAU-EVANS, A.B., A.M., Ph.D., 

Elementary Education 

A.B., A.M., Ph.D., University of Michigan. 
Advanced study, Mexico City. 



ELISABETH JARRELL FOSSE Y, B. MUS., 

Piano and Voice 

Piano: American Conservatory of Music, Chicago; student of piano with 
Victor Garwood, Chicago, and Theodor Bohlmann, Memphis ; pedagogy with 
John H. Hattstaedt at the American Conservatory, Chicago; theory with 
Grace Welsh, Chicago, Theodor Bohlmann, Memphis, and John Palmer, 
Chicago; children's piano methods with Louise Robyn and Ethel Lyon, 
American Conservatory, Chicago. Voice: Graduate work at American 
Conservatory of Music, Chicago, with Charles La Berge; study with E. 
Warren, K. Howe, and Karlton Hackett, Chicago ; 
opera classes with Charles La Berge. 



GERTRUDE I. McCAIN, A.B., A.M., Ph.D., 

Mathematics 
A.B., A.M., and Ph.D., Indiana University. 



RUTH MARR, B.S. in Ed., A.M., 

Education and Psychology 

B.S. in Education, Central Missouri State Teachers' College; A.M., Teachers' 
College, Columbia University ; graduate study, University of Missouri. 



DOROTHY GARRETT MELZER, Ph.B., A.M., 

Speech and Dramatics 

Ph.B., A.M., University of Chicago; graduate study Peabody College for 
Teachers, Scarritt College, Vanderbilt University. 



JOHN H. MELZER, A.M., Ph.D., 

Philosophy 

C.R.M., Concordia Seminary, St. Louis, Missouri ; A.M., Vanderbilt 

University; Graduate Scholarship, Yale University; 

Ph.D., Vanderbilt University. 



WILLIAM C. MOORE, A.B., B.D., 

Religion 

A.B., Lambuth College; B.D., Emory University; graduate study, Garrett 
Biblical Institute, Northwestern University. 

SAMUEL R. NEEL, B.A., Ph.D., 

Religion 
A.B., Emory and Henry College ; Ph.D., Duke University. 



ARTHUR D. OXLEY, B.S., A.M., 
Biology 

B.S., Iowa Wesleyan College; A.M., University of Arkansas; graduate 
study, University of Iowa, Iowa State College. 

H. L. PALMER, B.S., M.S., 
Business Administration 

B.S., Southwest Missouri State Teachers' College; M.S., University of 

Arkansas; residence requirements for Ph.D. degree completed, 

George Peabody College for Teachers. 

FRANCIS M. PULLIAM, A.B., A.M.,§ 

Mathematics and Physics 

A.B., University of Illinois ; A.M., University of Illinois ; residence require- 
ments for Ph.D. degree completed, University of Illinois. 

CHARLES G. PHELPS, JR., A.B., 

Physical Education 
A.B., Lambuth College ; graduate study, George Peabody College for 

Teachers. 

NANCY REBECCA RAULINS, A.B., M.S., 

Physical Science 
A.B., M.S., Tulane University; graduate study, University of Illinois. 

LUCILE BRIDGES TAYLOR, B.S., 

Business Administration 
B.S., Lambuth College. 

MAE ROGERS THOMAS 

Home Economics 
Murray State Teachers College; Emory University. 

BARNEY M. THOMPSON, B.S., M.Ed., 

Music 

B.S., Northwest Missouri State Teachers College; M.Ed., Missouri Uni- 
versity; Central College (diploma in piano) ; Lyceum Arts Con- 
servatory (graduate in dramatic art) ; Colorado College of 
Education; Voice with Theodore Harrison, 
American Conservatory of Music. 

HELEN M. WOMACK, A.B., A.M., 

Home Economics 

A.B., Lambuth College; A.M., George Peabody College for Teachers. 

§ On leave. 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

RICHARD ELWOOD WOMACK, A.B., A.M., LL.D President 

MARVIN EDWARD EAGLE, A.B., A.M _ Dean 

AUDREE M. THOMAS, Ph.B., A.M., B.D Business Manager 

HELEN WOMACK, A.B., A.M Registrar 

ARTHUR D. OXLEY, B.S., A.M _ Bean of Men 

EMILY HASTINGS CLARK, A.B., A.M Dean of Women 

ARTHUR E. EVANS, A.B., A.M Director of Publicity 

KATHARINE CLEMENT, A.B, A.M Librarian 

CHARLES G. PHELPS, JR., A.B 

Director of Physical Education 

NANCY SMITH, A.B Assistant Registrar 

MATIE FLETCHER _ Bookkeeper 

KATHERINE GARDNER Office Secretary 

MRS. RENAH. HAMPTON Matron 

MRS. ROBERT McGOWAN Dietitian 

MURRY WHITEHORN Engineer 



COMMITTEES OF FACULTY 

Curriculum — The President, The Dean, The Registrar, Oxley, 
Palmer, Evans, Marr. 

Accrediting and Classification— The Registrar, The Dean, 
Marr. 

Student Advisory — The Dean, The Dean of Men, The Dean 
of Women. 

Library — The Librarian, S. V. Clement, Thomas, J. H. Melzer, 
Moore. 

Athletics — Thomas, Eagle, Palmer, Taylor, J. H. Melzer. 

Religious Activities — Neel, Raulins, Clark. 

Public Functions — Palmer, Clark, Thompson, Fossey. 

Publications— Evans, Thomas, Taylor. 

Social— Clark, Oxley, K. Clement, Neel, D. Melzer. 



10 CATALOGUE OF 



HISTORY 

At the Memphis Annual Conference, held at McKenzie, 
Tennessee, in November, 1921, it was decided that there should 
be established at Jackson, Tennessee, a co-educational institu- 
tion of standard college grade to be known as Lambuth College. 
Since 1843 the Memphis Conference had maintained a*i 
interest in the Memphis Conference Female Institute at 
Jackson, (established by the Presbyterians in 1837) and from 
1911 to 1920 had owned the Institute outright. The institution 
was closed in 1920, the property was sold, a new site purchased, 
and the present Administration Building was erected in 1922. 
By an amendment to the old charter of 1843 the name was 
changed to Lambuth College. 

On September 10, 1924 the College opened its first session, 
offering the first two years of college work. In 1925 the 
junior year was added, and in 1926 the senior year. At the 
annual meeting of the Tennessee College Association, held in 
April, 1927, Lambuth was admitted to membership in this 
organization as a standard college. 

Because of insufficient endowment the college is not a 
member of the Southern Association of Colleges and Secondary 
Schools. However, its students experience no difficulty in 
securing full credit for their work at the leading institutions 
of this region. 

Lambuth College has been given full certification privileges 
by the State Board of Education of Tennessee, and several 
other states recognize the College as a teacher training insti- 
tution. 



AIMS 

The general aim of Lambuth College is, to use the words of 
the late Ernest DeWitt Burton, ''to develop . . . personalities 
capable of full participation in life and of significant contri- 
bution to life." 

More specifically, Lambuth College aims: 

To enable its students to understand and appreciate more 
fully the physical universe in which they live and to relate 
themselves properly to it; 

To give them an appreciation of the contributions of the 
past to the present and to put them into possession of some of 
the cultural and spiritual heritage of the race ; 



LAMBUTH COLLEGE 11 

To give them a sense of social responsibility and to enable 
them to identify their good with that of the social organism; 

To enlarge their conception of God and of religion, and to 
make them more intelligent, useful and devoted Christians. 

An immediate aim of the college is to provide for the Mem- 
phis Conference a group of ministerial and lay workers who 
are equipped intellectually, socially, and religiously for leader- 
ship in the work of our church. 

LOCATION 

Geographically Lambuth College has an ideal situation. 
Jackson, a city of about 30,000 people, is in the heart of the 
Memphis Conference territory. It is reached by three rail- 
roads and by several good highways, which touch almost every 
part of the Conference. It is a city of churches, schools and 
numerous wide-awake civic organizations. Jackson is acces- 
sible to hundreds of prospective college students, many of 
whom attend Lambuth College from home by train, bus, or 
private conveyance. 

BUILDINGS 

The Administration Building is a handsome, three-story 
structure with a basement at one end. It contains offices, class 
rooms, laboratories, the library, and the chapel. Until a girls' 
dormitory can be built the third floor will be used to house 
young women students. 

Epworth Hall, the dormitory for men, occupies a beautiful 
site facing Lambuth Boulevard, just south of the main campus. 
This dormitory is a modern fireproof building containing fifty 
bed rooms. The dining room and kitchen are located here. 

The President's Home is a nine-room brick veneer build- 
ing located on Fairground Street facing the college campus. 
It was acquired in 1942. 

The Music Building is a seven-room frame building which 
houses the studios and practice rooms for the Music Depart- 
ment. This building is on the Epworth Hall campus. 

CAMPUS 

The campus, consisting of twenty-two acres, lies on the west 
side of Lambuth Boulevard in the northwest part of the city. 
It is one of the most beautiful spots in Jackson. Space is 
provided for tennis courts, football and baseball fields, and 
a golf course. 



12 CATALOGUE OF 



EQUIPMENT 

The entire equipment of the college is modern and of high 
grade. Steel furniture is used in both dormitories. In every 
department of the college the equipment has been chosen not 
only for durability, but for attractiveness of appearance. 



EXPENSES 

The College authorities encourage the students to practice 
economy in their personal expenditures, and seek the co- 
operation of parents to this end. Every effort is made to keep 
the cost of a college education within the reach of every 
worthy and capable young man and woman. 



Tuition 

The tuition for the session is $135.00. This is payable in in- 
stallments of $22.50 on each of the following dates : September 
18, November 1, January 2, February 10, March 24, and May 1. 
Payment of tuition enables the student to take any of the reg- 
ular courses offered by the college. The regular tuition does 
not include private lessons in the Department of Music. Rates 
for music courses will be found on page 46. Laboratory fees, 
are additional for students taking laboratory courses. These 
are listed below. 

Full tuition is charged students carrying a load of more than 
twelve quarter hours. Charges for a student carrying twelve 
hours or less are computed on the basis of $4.00 per quarter 
hour for the first three hours and $3.50 per hour for each 
additional quarter hour. All part time students, however, are 
required to pay the maintenance fee. Laboratory fees in 
science courses are also additional. 

Tuition payments of part time students are due on the dates 
named above for the payment of tuition by regular students. 

A concession of $60 on the annual tuition and term fees is 
given to children of active ministers and to ministerial students. 
No further reduction is made such students unless they carry 
a load of six hours or less. In this case they pay the same rates 
as other part time students. 

For a student to be classed as a ministerial student he must 
hold a license to preach from the Methodist Church, or a state- 
ment from the proper authorities of another denomination that 
he has indicated his desire to enter the ministry. 



LAMBUTH COLLEGE 13 



Maintenance Fee 

A maintenance fee of $5.00 a quarter, or $15.00 for the session, 
is required of every student who enrolls in the college. This 
is payable on tuition paying dates. It includes the usual fees 
for matriculation, library, and physical education. The pay- 
ment of this fee entitles the student to witness, without extra 
charge, all athletic contests participated in by the Lambuth 
teams on the home field; to participate in the physical educa- 
tion program; to use the library; to attend such musical 
programs as the college may arrange for the benefit of the 
students, and to secure a copy of the Lantern. 

Diploma Fee 

A diploma fee of $10.00 is required of each graduate. 

Laboratory Fees 

The following laboratory fees are charged students who 
take laboratory courses. These are payable on tuition paying 
dates. 

BIOLOGY— 

Biology 1 (a, b, c), per quarter _ $1.50 

Biology 25 (a, b, c), per quarter » 3.00 

Biology 30 (a, b, c), per quarter 1.00 

business administration- 
Bus. Adm. 19, per quarter _ _ 5.00 

Bus. Adm. 20 (b, c), per quarter _ _ 2.50 

(Students enrolled for B.A. 19 and 20 will be charged 

a fee of only $5.00 per quarter.) 

Bus. Adm. 21, per quarter _ _ 1.00 

Bus. Adm. 26, per quarter _ 5.00 

Bus. Adm. 27 (b, c), per quarter. 2.50 

(Students enrolled for B.A. 26 and 27 will be charged 

a fee of only $5.00 per quarter.) 

EDUCATION— 

Education 4 (a, b), per quarter „....„ 1.50 

Education 6 _ „ 1.00 

Education 25 _ _ _ _ 5.00 

Education 56 _ _ _ 1.00 

Education 79 _ „ _ 1.00 



14 CATALOGUE OF 



HOME ECONOMICS— 

Home Ec. 15 (a, b, c), per quarter $6.00 

Home Ec. 25 1.00 

Home Ec. 26 1.00 

Home Ec. 27 1.00 

Home Ec. 28 1.00 

Home Ec. 50 1.00 

Home Ec. 56 : 1.00 

Home Ec. 76 — No extra fee is charged for dormitory stu- 
dents. For day students the fee is the same as board and room 
for six weeks. 



PHYSICAL SCIENCE— 

Chemistry 2 (a, b, c), per quarter $5.00 

Chemistry 31, 32, 33, per quarter 5.00 

Chemistry 61 (a, b, c), per quarter 7.00 

Chemistry 71 7.00 

Chemistry 81 (a, b, c), per quarter _ 4.00 

Chemistry 91 (a, b, c), per two hours' credit „ 5.00 

Breakage and non-returnable deposit: 

Chemistry 2 (a, b, c) per quarter 1.50 

Other Chemistry courses per quarter 2.50 

Physics 1 (a, b, c), per quarter _ 4.00 

Physical Science 1 (a, b, c), per quarter 2.00 



MUSI<>- 

Use of Piano for Practice : 

One hour a day, per quarter 2.50 

Each additional hour a day, per quarter 1.25 



Board and Room 

Board in the dormitory costs $207.00 for the session of nine 
months. 

The College reserves the right to change the price of board 
at the beginning of any six weeks' period provided fluctuations 
in the price of foodstuffs make this necessary. 

Eoom in the dormitory costs $54.00 for the session. Each 
student in Epworth Hall is required to deposit a breakage fee 
of $5.00 for the session. A student desiring to room alone pays 
an extra charge of $2.00 a month. Rooms in the girls' dormi- 



LAMBUTH COLLEGE 15 

tory are provided with furniture, mattresses, rugs, heat, light, 
hot and cold water. Rooms in boys' dormitory are furnished 
with furniture, mattresses, light and heat. Each student is 
required to bring with him a supply of bed linen, covers, 
towels, pillows, etc. 

Board and room rent are payable on dates for tuition pay- 
ments. A regular installment of board and room rent must be 
paid before the student is admitted to the dormitory. 



Regulations Regarding Payments 

Tuition and fees must be paid or arranged for before the 
student is admitted to classes. A student withdrawing during 
the first week of a quarter will be refunded all charges for 
tuition and fees except $10.00 to cover the cost of registration. 
After the first week no refund will be made unless the student 
is disqualified by severe illness for as much as three weeks. 
In such case one-half his tuition for that six weeks' period is 
refunded. 

All bills for tuition, board and fees of all kinds must be paid 
in full or provided for in a manner satisfactory to the ad- 
ministration before the student may receive college credit. 

Students will not be permitted to become seriously delinquent 
in the payment of their bills. The college cannot afford to 
offer rates as low as those listed above unless students keep 
their accounts paid on time. 

Incidentals 

The early training and habits of people vary so much that 
it is impossible to estimate the incidental expenses of a student 
for a session. Many of our students must pay part of their 
expenses by working and necessity requires that they practice 
strict economy. All others are urged to do so. 



Summary of Expenses 

Six Weeks Quarter Session 

Tuition $22.50 $ 45.00 $135.00 

Maintenance fee 2.50 5.00 15.00 

Room 9.00 18.00 54.00 

Board 34.50 69.00 207.00 

Total $68.50 $137.00 $411.00 

These figures do not include books and laboratory fees. 



16 CATALOGUE OF 



SELF-HELP 

The College offers to a limited number of students the 
opportunity to pay part of their expenses by performing cer- 
tain tasks connected with the maintenance of the institution, 
such as waiting tables, washing dishes, house cleaning, 
assisting in the library, or in the laboratories. The College has 
many more applications for employment than it can fill. It is 
possible for a few students to find places in the city where 
they can work for room or board. In assigning students to 
jobs the College takes into account the need of the student 
for help, his past record for faithfulness, and his fitness for 
the task. 

Money earned in this way must be applied on the student's 
obligations to the College. 

STUDENT LOAN FUNDS 

The Mattie Rice Walker Loan Fund. This is an endowed 
loan fund established in 1944 by Mr. C. M. "Walker, of Dyers- 
burg, Tennessee, the income from which is to be used to assist 
worthy Dyersburg High School students in meeting their ex- 
penses at Lambuth College. The recipient of the loan is 
determined annually by a committee of the high school faculty. 
In case there should be no applicant from the Dyersburg High 
School, the College has the privilege of selecting some other 
worthy boy or girl, preference to be given to a ministerial 
student. The beneficiary of the loan shall make a non-interest 
bearing note. When the loan is repaid, the money is to be 
turned back into the loan fund, to be reloaned. It is one of the 
conditions that the recipient shall neither use tobacco in any 
way, nor drink spiritous liquors while benefiting from this 
fund. 

Jackson First Church W. M. S. Loan Fund. In 1931 the 

Woman's Missionary Society of the First Methodist Church, 
Jackson, Tennessee, gave $500.00 toward establishing a loan 
fund for worthy students. 

Lillian Howard Murphy Sunday School Glass Loan Fund. 
This loan fund of $120.00 was provided by a class of young 
women of the First Methodist Church, Jackson, taught by 
Mrs. Lillian Howard Murphy. 

W. P. Prichard Loan Fund. The late Rev. W. P. Prichard 
of Murray, Kentucky, established a loan fund for worthy 
students which now amounts to $1,000.00 

Clem Wadsworth Student Loan Fund. In 1938 Mr. Clem 



LAMBUTH COLLEGE 17 

Wadsworth of Ripley, Tennessee, established a $500.00 loan 
fund for the benefit of students who expect to engage in full 
time religious work. 

Chi Omega Loan Fund. A revolving loan fund of $40.00 was 
given by the Chi Omega Alumnae Chapter of Jackson in 1936. 
A senior girl recommended by a committee of the faculty will 
be the beneficiary. 

Sallie Parker Lacy Loan Fund. This is a loan fund of 
$190.00, established in 1944 by Mrs. Bardwell Murdoch, Mrs. 
Sudie McNeill and Miss Esther Hunt. 

Several other small loan funds have been provided at various 
times by the following individuals : the late Mrs. Drusilla 
McCutcheon and Reverend E. L. Robinson, who established the 
first loan fund ; Mrs. Florence Collins of St. Petersburg, Florida, 
in memory of her son; and the late Mrs. Mary Alice Vaughn. 
These funds are all administered in keeping with the wishes of 
the donors. 



SCHOLARSHIPS 

No student may be eligible for more than one unendowed 
scholarship in any given year. 

Adine M. Taylor Scholarship. This scholarship was estab- 
lished in 1930 by the late Mrs. Adine M. Taylor of Paducah, 
Kentucky, who bequeathed to the college $3,000.00. The in- 
terest on this amount is used to support the scholarship. 

Eliza Bowe Curtsinger Scholarship. This scholarship was 
established in 1935 by the late Mrs. Eliza Bowe Curtsinger of 
Bardwell, Kentucky, for the benefit of ministerial students. It 
amounts to $60.00 a year, the interest on $1,000.00 at the rate 
of 6 per cent. 

Annie Lou Jones Scholarship. By her will the late Miss 
Annie Lou Jones, of Jackson, Tennessee, left an apartment 
house to Lambuth College. The income from this property is 
to be used to pay the tuition of worthy students. Since her life 
work was teaching, this fund will extend the useful service of 
Miss Jones indefinitely. The fund was established in 1941. 

Scholarships to Honor Students. The College regularly 
offers to the valedictorian of each standard high school within 
its territory a scholarship of $60.00, for one year only. To the 
salutatorian of each graduating class it offers a scholarship 
worth $40.00, for one year only. A certified statement from 
the principal of the high school must be presented by the 



18 CATALOGUE OF 

applicant for one of these scholarships. These are offered by 
the college for the purpose of insuring a larger number of 
students of promise in its freshman class. 

Scholarships to Ministerial Students. See pages 12, 16, 17. 

Scholarships to Children of Ministers. See page 12. 

AWARDS 

Omega Upsilon Lambda Award. Each year the Omega Up- 
silon Lambda Sorority awards a silver loving cup to the stu- 
dent who has rendered the largest service to the college during 
his connection with it. Character and ideals, scholarship, par- 
ticipation in student activities, leadership qualities, co-opera- 
tiveness and general usefulness are considered. The recipient 
of this loving cup is selected by the faculty. 

Since 1928 such a choice has been made by the faculty each 
year. The loving cup will take the place of the medal formerly 
offered by Mr. C. K. Wilkerson, and later by the faculty. 

Below are the names of those who have been chosen for this 
honor since 1928. 

Raymond Council 1929 

Frances Reid 1930 

J.S.Scott 1931 

Emily Hastings 1932 

C. C. Miller, Jr m 1933 

Mary Elizabeth Roach 1934 

Glenn Bradbury 1935 

Wavy Batts 1936 

Ella Kathryn Waynick 1937 

Marcus Gurley 1938 

Rhea Smith „...._ _ 1939 

Coffman Mitchell _...„ 1940 

Charles Cosner _ _ 1941 

Malcolm McMillan _ 1942 

Virginia Bishop _ 1943 

Anne Leeper 1944 

Jimmie Ruth Boulton 1945 

Beta Sigma Alpha Award. Beginning in 1936 the Beta 
Sigma Alpha Sorority has each year awarded a gold pin to the 
most representative junior. This selection is made by the 
senior class. The award has been made as follows: 

Curtis -Sullivan _ . 1936 

Louise Haskins - _ 1937 

Rhea Smith _ 1938 

Charles Cosner ........ _ _ _....„ 1939 

Lloyd Ramer _ _ 1940 



LAMBUTH COLLEGE 19 



Jack Phelps - 1941 

W. A. Nance 1942 

Nancy Smith _ _ 1943 

Patty Jolley 1944 

Mary Torii 1945 

Omega Alumnae Award. Beginning in 1940 the Omega 
Upsilon Lambda Alumnae has offered a key to the senior who 
has made the highest average in the English Department dur- 
ing his four years of residence. The recipient must have had 
a minimum of twenty-four quarter hours in English. The 
award has been made as follows: 

Sue Blancett _...._ _ 1940 

Annie Belle Rawls _ 1941 

Lucile Bridges 1942 

Anna Nell Bland - _ 1943 

Martha Frances Bobbins 1944 

Jimmie Ruth Boulton 1945 

Tau Delta Award. Beginning in 1944 the Tau Delta Sorority 
has offered an award to the person in the graduating class who 
has made the highest scholastic average in 192 hours, or more, 
of work taken in Lambuth College. The award has been made 
as follows: 

Louise Mathis Warmath 1944 

Jimmie Ruth Boulton 1945 

REGULATIONS RELATING TO STUDENTS 

Statement of High School Work 

A properly certified statement of the student's high school 
work should be sent to the College before the fall opening, and 
must be in the hands of the Registrar not later than the end 
of the first quarter. The final enrollment of a student is 
deferred until such a statement has been sent in by the proper 
preparatory or high school authorities and evaluated by the 
Registrar of the College. 

Registration 

The days set aside for regular registration are indicated in 
the college calendar at the beginning of the catalogue. 

Within the first three school days following registration the 
student may make desired changes in his schedule, but for each 
change made on his own motion after this he is charged a fee 
of one dollar. 

Students registering after the third day of regular regis- 
tration will pay an additional fee of $1.00. 



20 CATALOGUE OF 

Classification of Students 

The student may be regularly classified after his secondary 
school record has been accepted. 

Normal progress in the College requires that a student carry 
48 quarter hours each year and earn an equal number of 
quality credits. For convenience in administration all regular 
students are classified early in the fall quarter according to 
the following standards: 

FRESHMEN: Those who have completed fewer than 42 
quarter hours. 

SOPHOMORES: Those who have completed 42 quarter 
hours. 

JUNIORS: Those who have completed 96 quarter hours, 
with 96 quality credits. 

SENIORS : Those who have completed 138 quarter hours, 
with 138 quality credits. 

Admission to Advanced Standing 

To secure advanced standing in the College the student 
must present an official certificate showing that he has com- 
pleted sufficient work in some recognized college or university. 
He must also present the usual certificate showing that he has 
completed our entrance requirements. If he cannot show a 
sufficient number of high school units, part of his advanced 
work will be counted toward making up the deficiency. 

Grading and Reports 

The following passing grades are given: A, excellent; B, 
good; C, average; D, poor. F indicates a failure; I, incom- 
plete work. A report of the standing of each student is made 
to the parent or guardian each quarter, and a duplicate of this 
report is furnished the student. A student making I or F will 
be given the following quarter to remove the condition. In- 
structors turning in to the Registrar's office a grade of I must 
file with the report of the grade a written statement of the 
work required to remove the condition. 

In reporting students who have dropped courses instructors 
will indicate the character of work done by the student up to 
that point by the use of the phrase "dropped passing' ' or 
"dropped failing". 

Quality Credits 

A student must earn 192 quality points before a degree 
will be conferred. For a course carried throughout a quarter 
with a grade of A, three (3) quality points per quarter hour 
will be awarded; for a grade of B, two (2) quality points; 
for a grade of C, one (1) quality point. 



LAMBUTH COLLEGE 21 



Students who maintain an average of 2.125 quality points 
per quarter hour throughout their entire college course will 
receive their degrees cum laude; those who maintain an aver- 
age of 2.5 quality points per quarter hour throughout their 
entire college course will receive their degrees magna cum 
laude; and those who maintain an average of 2.875 quality 
points per quarter hour throughout their entire college course 
will receive their degrees summa cum laude. To be eligible 
for a degree with honors, the student must have earned all his 
credits in Lambuth College. 

Maximum and Minimum Number of Hours 
Sixteen hours per quarter constitute a normal amount of 
work for a student. The amount of work a student may carry 
in excess of sixteen hours depends on the quality of work he 
does and the number of extra-curricular activities in which he 
engages. The authority to enroll a student for more or less 
than a normal load is vested in the Dean. 

Absence 

If a student is absent from more than one-sixth of the 
meetings of any course, he will be dropped from the course. 
If he is failing the course at the time he is dropped, the grade 
for that course will be recorded as an F. If a student's ab- 
sence is from all courses, and unavoidable, he may be per- 
mitted to re-enter certain of these courses on the approval of 
the Dean. 

Freshmen and sophomores must attend all classes unless 
excused by the Dean. 

If a student is tardy three times in one class, one absence 
will be charged against him. 

Probation 

Any student passing less than twelve hours of work in any 
quarter, or any student not passing all his work if taking less 
than twelve hours, will be placed on probation for one quarter. 

Should he fail to pass the required amount of work during 
this quarter, his case will be considered by the accrediting 
committee, and he may be asked to withdraw. 

Participation in Student Activities 

Students will be checked on grades at the end of each six 
weeks' term. Neither probation students nor regular students 
passing less than twelve hours may represent the college in 
any public activity, such as dramatic club performance, de- 
bating or athletic contests. Part time students are eligible 
to represent the college in such activities if they are passing 



22 CATALOGUE OF 

all their work. 

Examinations 

Regular. Regular examinations are held during the closing 
week of each quarter. In determining the standing of a student 
in any subject the daily class work counts as five-sixths and 
the examination grade as one-sixth. 

Comprehensive. A comprehensive examination, mostly oral, 
is given each candidate for graduation. The examination 
covers all courses taken by the candidate in his major and 
minor subjects. The examining committee consists of the Dean 
as chairman, the major professor and the minor professor. 
When the Dean is either the major or the minor professor, 
he will appoint the third member of the committee from the 
faculty. 

Seniors may take a seminar in the major field for one quarter 
in lieu of the comprehensive examination. 

Special. The lowest passing grade in all courses is D. A 
student who makes less than D on any course due to final ex- 
amination failure is permitted one special examination. Fail- 
ing to pass the special examination, he is required to repeat 
the course. A student willfully absenting himself from a regu- 
lar examination will be given a special examination only by 
permission of the faculty. Request for this privilege must be 
made in writing, the cause of absence specified, and a fee of 
one dollar paid. 

No examination will be given on work that has not been 
taken regularly in class. 

Transcript of Record 

Each student may receive two copies of his transcript with- 
out charge. For each additional copy one dollar is charged. 
However, no transcript is furnished until the student has paid 
his account, or made satisfactory arrangements for its settle- 
ment. 

Chapel Attendance 

A brief chapel service is held three times a week in the 
College auditorium. Attendance is compulsory. On Monday 
and Wednesday the president and members of the faculty have 
the responsibility for the exercises; on Friday the students. 

Church Attendance 

All students are expected to attend Sunday school and at 
least one preaching service each Sunday. Participation in the 
work of young people's organizations in the churches of the 
city is also urged. Students are encouraged to attend religious 



LAMBUTH COLLEGE 23 



services and take part in Christian work. 

Boarding Places 

All boarding students are expected to live in the dormitories. 
Under certain conditions, however, students may arrange to 
live in private boarding places. Young women students board- 
ing in the homes of citizens are under the general supervision 
of the Dean of Women, and young men students are responsible 
to the Dean of Men. 

Dormitory Regulations 

In the dormitories an effort is made to give the student the 
atmosphere of a well-ordered home. Of course, a few regula- 
tions are necessary. Students are expected to respect the 
rights of others, to be orderly in their habits, and to assist the 
College authorities in making the dormitories as home-like as 
possible. Each dormitory is under the direct supervision of 
a matron. 

Discipline 

Lambuth College is an institution with Christian ideals. It 
seeks to take young men and women who have been brought 
up in Christian homes and continue their training. As far as 
possible only constructive methods of discipline will be em- 
ployed. Students are expected to exercise self-restraint and 
to conduct themselves at all times as ladies and gentlemen. At 
the same time the College authorities throw every possible 
safe-guard around the students in order to make it easier for 
them to live right. Students who are addicted to loafing, 
drinking, gambling or other forms of immorality, are not per- 
mitted to remain in the College. 

Hazing is strictly forbidden. Certain forms of freshman 
initiation are permitted. This initiation program is planned by 
a special committee of the Student-Body Association and is 
restricted to such activities as are prescribed by this commit- 
tee and approved by the Student-Body Association and the 
college administration. 

Athletics 

During the war Lambuth College discontinued all inter- 
collegiate athletics. Inter-collegiate boys' basketball was 
resumed during last session. As need arises, other forms of 
athletics will be placed on an inter-collegiate basis. Special 
attention is given, however, to intra-mural sports. All students 
are encouraged to participate in one or more of these sports 



24 CATALOGUE OF 



because of the mental and physical benefits to be derived from 
such action. The college authorities believe that, from the 
standpoint of character formation, wholesome recreational 
activities play an important part in a student's education. 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 

Certain forms of extra-curricular student organizations are 
maintained and promoted in the college. The college recog- 
nizes that there is an important phase of a liberal education 
which can come only through activities outside the classroom. 
The following associations and clubs are officially recognized 
by the college and are responsible to the Director of 
Activities. 

Student Body Association. This is an organization of the 
entire student body, which aims especially at fostering college 
spirit, and through which the students act collectively in all 
their college relations. 

The Student Christian Association. This organization is re- 
sponsible for all student religious activities on the campus. 
Through its committees it carries on such activities as weekly 
vesper services, Fellowship Team trips, social service work, 
and world friendship projects. It sponsors such things as 
Religious Emphasis Week and the visits of outstanding reli- 
gious leaders to the campus. All students are urged to belong 
to the SCA and to participate in its activities as a part of their 
college experience. 

The Dramatic Club. The purpose of this organization is to 
give those students who have ability in dramatic work an 
opportunity to cultivate this talent and gain poise and self- 
confidence in public appearances. 

The Modern Language Club. The club is composed of those 
modern language students who are especially interested in de- 
veloping an active control of their language and acquiring a 
more cultural acquaintance with the customs and literature 
of the people. 

The Music Club. This club is a member of the Tennessee 
Federation of Music. Opportunities for appearance on pro- 
grams are given all students of the music department. 

The Home Economics Club. This club is composed of those 
Home Economics students who are especially interested in 
Home Economics education. The aims of the club are to stimu- 
late an interest in home making, establish ideals as to the 
importance of the home-making job, and develop an apprecia- 



LAMBUTH COLLEGE 25 



tion of home life in the minds of the students, so that they may 
become leaders in home and community life. 

The Literary Forum. This club is composed of juniors and 
seniors who have at least eighteen quarter hours in English 
and who plan to major or minor in that field. The member- 
ship is limited. 

The "L" Club. This club is composed of all students who 
have been awarded an "L" by the college athletic committee. 
The aims of the club are to promote amateur athletics in the 
College and to develop in the players appreciation of the ideals 
for which the Department of Physical Education stands. 

Social Clubs. There are three recognized social clubs for 
girls in the College, all under the supervision of the Director 
of Student Activities. The officers and members of these or- 
ganizations are required to conduct their affairs in keeping 
with a few faculty regulations. No club shall assess dues or 
other charges totaling more than $5.00 a quarter nor adopt 
a pin that costs more than $10.00. Each club shall have the 
privilege of a room for its meetings as long as it is convenient 
for the College to provide it. It is understood and agreed 
that a student's loyalty to her club shall be subordinate 
to her loyalty to Lambuth College. Any tendency of club 
groups to destroy the unity of the College community will not 
be tolerated by college authorities. 

Veterans' Club. The Veterans' Club was founded during 
the fall quarter of 1945 by a group of ex-service men. Mem- 
bership in the organization is open to all persons, both students 
and faculty, who are serving in the armed forces or have re- 
ceived a discharge other than dishonorable. The purposes of 
the club are: (1) to strengthen fellowship among students; 
(2) to promote the interests and policies of the college; (3) to 
promote honesty and industry among the members ; (4) to aid 
the veteran in every way possible. 

Students desiring to organize a new club shall present their 
petition to the Student Advisory Committee of the faculty with 
the signature of all charter members. If approval is secured, 
the new club may operate a year on probation. If at the end 
of this time it is found in good standing, it shall be entitled to 
the full privileges of Lambuth College clubs. 

Organizations and clubs not complying with the regulations 
for extra-curricular activities are not permitted to operate in 
the College. 



26 CATALOGUE OF 



PUBLICATIONS 

The Lambuth Messenger. The Messenger, formerly the 
News-Letter, the organ of the college administration, is pub- 
lished six times a year. It carries to the alumni and other 
friends of the college news of important happenings on the 
campus and special articles dealing with the aims, purposes 
and educational philosophy of the institution. 

The Lambuth Vision. The Lambuth Vision is the student 
newspaper. It is published weekly by a staff elected by the 
students. 

The Lantern. The Lantern is the college annual. The first 
issue of this publication appeared in 1927. It is managed 
jointly by the administration and the students. 



THE LIBRARY 

A small, but carefully selected, library has been built up 
since the college opened. New books are being constantly 
added. More than fifty of the best magazines come regularly 
to the reading room. During 1946 the sum of $7,500 will be 
spent for new books and periodicals. 



LABORATORIES 

Facilities are provided for laboratory courses in Botany, 
Business Administration, Chemistry, Clothing, Foods, Physics 
and Zoology. 



STUDENT COUNSELING 

The College makes a special effort to know the personal 
problems and individual traits of each student and to use this 
information in counseling him. The college authorities be- 
lieve that close personal contacts with teachers of character, 
personality and training mean much to the developing life of a 
college student. The Dean of the College, the Dean of Men and 
the Dean of Women give considerable time to the consideration 
of the personal problems of the students. The Director 
of Activities advises with the individual student in an effort 
to secure for each student a well-balanced extra-curricular 
program. Each teacher also serves as counselor to a small 
group of students. 



LAMBUTH COLLEGE 27 



REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 

For admission to the freshman class the College requires 
that a student offer by certificate from an accredited high 
school fifteen units, or that he pass satisfactorily an examina- 
tion on the courses required for admission. An entrance unit 
is the measure of the work required for completion of one 
high school subject taken five times each week, in recitation 
periods of forty-five minutes throughout a session of thirty- 
six weeks. For the average high school student four units 
make a year's work. Such a student should be able in four 
years to complete the entrance requirements of Lambuth. 

Of the fifteen units required for entrance to the course lead- 
ing to the degree of Bachelor of Arts, three shall be in English. 
Of the remaining twelve units required not more than four 
shall be in vocational subjects. 

Persons twenty-one years of age and over who cannot offer 
the required number of units for admission may register as 
special students for such courses as they may be able to carry. 
All entrance requirements must be fully met, however, before 
special students can become candidates for graduation. 

Veterans 20 years of age who cannot offer the required 
number of units for admission may register as special students 
on the above condition. 

A student who seeks to enter on certificate from an ac- 
credited high school should send for accrediting blank, have 
it filled out by the principal or superintendent, and forward 
it at once to the Registrar's office, so that it may be examined 
and the amount of credit determined before the session begins. 

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

Lambuth College confers the degree of Bachelor of Arts and 
the degree of Bachelor of Science. Sixty-four session hours, 
or 192 quarter hours and an equal number of quality points, 
are required for graduation. No student may receive more 
than one degree. 

Students transferring from other institutions are required 
to spend at least three quarters in residence and do at least 
forty-five hours of work in Lambuth before they can receive 
their degrees. 

All candidates for graduation are required to pass a compre- 
hensive examination on their major and minor subjects, or to 
take a seminar of one quarter in the major field. 

Requirements for the Degree of Bachelor of Arts 

The minimum requirements by departments for the degree 



28 CATALOGUE OF 

of Bachelor of Arts are : eighteen hours in English, nine in 
Composition and nine in Literature; twelve in Religion; nine 
in History ; eighteen in Science, at least eight hours in each of 
two of the following: Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Mathe- 
matics; nine in Foreign Language, if taken in same language 
offered for entrance and eighteen if taken in a language not 
offered for entrance ; six hours in Psychology and six hours in 
Sociology, or nine hours in Social Science. 

In the major subjects the student is required to complete a 
sequence of thirty-six hours; in a minor subject, twenty-four 
hours. Forty per cent of this work must be on senior college 
level. Major and minor subjects must be chosen not later than 
the beginning of the junior year. 

A major may be taken in Biology, Business Administration, 
Chemistry, English, History, Home Economics, Mathematics, 
Spanish, Philosophy, Music, French, Religion, or Social Science. 

A minor may be taken in either of the above, except Music. 

Requirements for the Degree of Bachelor of Science 

The minimum requirements for the degree of Bachelor of 
Science are: eighteen hours in English, nine in composition 
and nine in Literature ; nine in Religion ; nine in American 
History or American Democracy; six in Sociology; nine in 
Natural Science; six in Psychology; and nine in Health. 

In the major subject the student is required to complete a 
sequence of thirty-six hours; in a minor subject twenty-four 
hours. Forty per cent of this work must be on senior college 
level. Majors and minors must be chosen not later than the 
beginning of the Junior year. 

A major or a minor may be taken in Biology, Chemistry, 
Business Administration, History, Home Economics, Mathe- 
matics or Social Science. 

TEACHER TRAINING COURSE 

Students wishing to qualify for an elementary teacher's 
certificate must register for the following courses: 

Freshman Year . 

Education 1 (a, b, c)£(* 5.&ft../:. A jlA?^^..f„.iR.L5 9 hours 

English 1 (a, b, c) &&MpjJLjt JLaBXAXmICi 9 hours 

History 3 (a, b, c )...//. .XVS..-..... l //.i.i.../:.. # 9 hours 

Science ^.y fi /$ ^ or 12 hours 

Physical Education 2 rJ^YSet ifc&taJJI 3 hours 

Education 4 (a, b) Ar..IZ....&.% fkXJki±JUUk&^ 6 hours 



LAMBUTH COLLEGE 29 



English 35 3 hours 

Sophomore Year 



Education 49 $t£jfiueL T?XY..../ 3 hours 

Education 53 fiJsJLld L&L3JZ 3 hours 

English 25 (a, b, c) L .^ 9 hours 

Business Administration 25 (a, b, c )JE*x m.*J6LMLJL. 9 hours 

Biology 30 (a, b, c) .. y j. / „~ *.... 9 hours 

Education 25 (eighteen, weeks )J3.X^J,J?XfA l*.tek' 3 hours 

Music 6 (a, b, c), 32.S 'Air ^.f ifa J _jAJi.i^yj.LC6 hours 
Education 6..4y.i±fcm*^ 3 hours 



PRE-PROFESSIONAL COURSES 

Students who have completed three sessions (144 quarter 
hours) at Lambuth College and who desire to enter a profes- 
sional school, may transfer 48 quarter hours of professional 
work in law, medicine, or theology and meet the requirements 
for a degree at Lambuth College. 

Pre-Medical Course 

The following course is suggested for students who are pre- 
paring to enter schools of medicine : 

Freshman Year 

Biological Science 1 (a, b, c), or 

Physical Science 1 (a, b, c) 9 or 12 quarter hours, 

Mathematics 10 (a, b, c) 9 quarter hours 

English 1 (a, b, c) 9 quarter hours 

Chemistry 2 (a, b, c) 12 quarter hours 

Biology 25 (a, b, c) 12 quarter hours 

Sophomore Year 

Biological Science 1 (a, b, c), or 

Physical Science 1 (a, b, c) 9 or 12 quarter hours 

Social Science 1 (a, b, c), or 

Religion 1 (a, b, c) 9 quarter hours 

Chemistry 31, 32, 33 _ 12 quarter hours 

German 1 (a, b, c) 9 quarter hours 

Junior Year 

Physics 1 (a, b, c) _ 12 quarter hours 

Biology 60 (a, b, c) _ * 9 quarter hours 

Chemistry 61, 71 _ 16 quarter hours 



30 CATALOGUE OF 

Electives 18 quarter hours 

Pre-Engineering Course 

The following course is suggested for students who are pre- 
paring to enter schools of engineering: 

Freshman Year 

Chemistry 2 (a, b, c) 12 quarter hours 

Mathematics 1, 2, 3 15 quarter hours 

English 1 (a, b, c) 9 quarter hours 

Biological Science 1 (a, b, c), or 

Social Science 1 (a, b, c) 9 quarter hours 

Sophomore Year 

Mathematics 25 (a, b, c) 12 quarter hours 

Physics 1 (a, b, c) 12 quarter hours 

Chemistry 31, 32, 33 12 quarter hours 

Social Science 1 (a, b, c), or 

Biological Science 1 (a, b, c), or 

English 25 (a, b, c) 9 quarter hours 

Pre-Law Course 

The following courses are suggested for students interested 
in the study of Law : 

History 2, 3, 50; Education 78; Economics 50; Sociology 51; 
and Political Science 30. 



LAMBUTH COLLEGE 31 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 



Explanatory Note 

Courses ordinarily taken by freshmen are numbered 1-24; 
those intended for sophomores, 25-49; those usually taken by 
juniors, 50-74; and those planned for seniors, 75-99. 



BIOLOGY 

Professor Oxley 

The courses of this department are intended to give an in- 
creased appreciation of life and to serve as a basis for further 
work, such as medicine, agriculture, home economics, teaching 
and graduate study. 

1. (a, b, c) Introduction to the Biological Sciences. This 
course will extend the concepts built upon the order of the 
physical universe into the living world and show how an under- 
standing of life processes and principles may enable man to 
relate himself more effectively to the world in which he lives. 
Elected during the freshman or the sophomore year. Three 
hours a week throughout the year. Credit, nine quarter hours. 

25. (a, b, c) General Zoology. The principles of animal 
biology are studied as illustrated by study of the frog as a 
typical vertebrate and a survey of other representative ani- 
mals. Throughout the year. Open to all students. Credit, 
twelve quarter hours. 

30. (a, b, c) Human Physiology and Hygiene. This course 
is designed to promote health by study of the normal body and 
mind. Throughout the year. Credit, nine quarter hours. 

40. Trees. A course dealing with the identification, uses, 
distribution and ecology of our local shade and forest trees. 
Some time is spent on the many phases of forestry as they 
touch our lives. Spring quarter. Credit, three quarter hours. 

50. Conservation. An introduction to the principles and 
practices of conservation of our soil, forest and wild life 
resources with a background of ecology. Three hours a 
week throughout the Spring quarter. Credit, three quarter 
hours. On demand. 

60. (a, b, c) Principles of Modern Biology. Especially for 
teachers and other leaders. Heredity, eugenics and related 
problems are the basis of this course. Open to juniors and 
seniors, or by permission of the instructor. Throughout the 



32 CATALOGUE OF 



year. Credit, nine quarter hours. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Professor Palmer 
Mrs. Taylor 

These courses have been organized to meet the Department 
of Education requirements for the certification of commercial 
teachers in most of the Southern States. Those preparing to 
teach commercial subjects, as well as those interested pri- 
marily in secretarial and office positions, should take courses 
B.A. 19, B.A. 20, and B.A. 24. The following courses may not 
be counted toward an A.B. degree : Business Administration 
19, 20, 21, 26 and 27. 

Majors in Business Administration should complete the 
following courses: 

B.A. 24 — First Year Accounting, 9 quarter hours. 
B.A. 50 — Principles of Economics, 9 quarter hours. 

The remainder of the required hours are to be selected, in 
consultation with the major professor, from the other courses 
in the department. 

19. (a, b, c) Typewriting. This course aims to familiarize 
the student with the touch method of typewriting, with its 
application to letter-writing, tabulation, legal matter, manu- 
scripts, writing on ruled lines, billing, telegrams, etc. Credit, 
nine quarter hours. 

Typing Schedule — Ten hours weekly for students with no 
previous typing training. 

Speed Minimum for Beginners : 
19 (a) — 30 net words per minute. 
19 (b) — 40 net words per minute. 
19 (c) — 50 net words per minute. 

Placement with advanced standing will be determined by the 
instructor. 

20. (a, b, c) Gregg Shorthand. Prerequisites and sum- 
marized course requirements are given below. Five hours a 
week throughout the year. Credit, nine quarter hours. 

Minimum Words Per Minute 
Maximum 
Descriptive Titles Prerequisites Dictation Error 

Typing Familiar New Allowance 

20(a) Principles of Shorthand 1 Unit* 60 

20(b) Beginning Dictation 1 Unit* 75 65 S% 

20(c) Advanced Dictation 1 Unit* 90 80 S% 

*Or, concurrent enrollment in B.A. 19 — Typewriting. 

21. (a, b, c) Office Practice. Prerequisite : one year each, 



LAMBUTH COLLEGE 33 



typing and shorthand. This course affords the student a back- 
ground of business knowledge correlated with stenographic 
work. Filing, office machines, and business correspondence 
are introduced. Special attention is given to the letter of 
application and to the personal interview. Study is given to 
the development of personal traits desirable for a secretary. 
Two hours a week throughout the year. Credit, six quarter 
hours. 

23. (a, b, c) Business English. The object of this course 
is to drill students in the use of correct English and spelling 
for business purposes. Considerable time will be given to the 
mechanics of good business English, and in writing business 
letters and reports. Two hours a week throughout the year. 
Credit, six quarter hours. 

24. (a, b, c) First Year Accounting. This course develops 
the subject rapidly, devoting its time and emphasis to the fun- 
damental problems of accounting, with a minimum of book- 
keeping routine. Adequate problem and practice work is 
required. Five hours a week throughout the year. Credit, 
nine quarter hours. 

25. (a, b, c) Economic Geography. A comprehensive sur- 
vey of man 's use of the earth. This course is introductory and 
non-technical. It presents the materials and principles of fun- 
damental importance to students of modern business. Required 
for elementary teachers' certificates. Three hours a week 
throughout the year. Credit, nine quarter hours. 

26. (a, b, c). Advanced Typewriting. The aim of this 
course is to increase the accuracy and speed in typewriting 
with stress being placed on letter placement, preparation of 
legal papers, complex tabulation, and the confident ability to 
use all business forms and to manipulate all parts of the type- 
writer easily with sufficient speed and accuracy to complete 
any new task. Prerequisite : B.A. 19, or its equivalent. Three 
hours a week throughout the year. Credit, six quarter hours. 

27. (a, b, c) Advanced Shorthand. In this course adequate 
practice is given in dictation and transcription; dictation of 
letters, solid matter. Prerequisite: B.A. 20 or its equivalent. 
Three hours a week throughout the year. Credit, six quarter 
hours. 

30. (a, b, c) Government of the United States. Same as 
Social Science 30 (a, b, c). 

45. Business Mathematics. Three hours a week. Spring 
quarter. Credit, three quarter hours. 



34 CATALOGUE OF 

50. (a, b, c) Principles of Economics. Same as Social 
Science 50 (a, b, c). 

55. (a, b) Business Law. A study of the ordinary legal 
aspects of common business transactions. Three hours a week. 
Fall and winter quarters. Credit, six quarter hours. 

62. (a, b, c) Advanced Accounting. Accounting proce- 
dure in industry and business, including problems of account- 
ing peculiar to the various types of institutions. Five hours a 
week throughout the year. Credit, nine quarter hours. 

65. (a, b) Business Organization. This course deals with 
the several types of business organization: individual proprie- 
torships, partnerships, joint stock companies, and corporations. 
Three hours a week, fall and winter quarters. Credit, six 
quarter hours. 

75. (a, b) Economic History. Same as History 75 (a, b). 

Professor Eagle. 

80. Money and Banking. A study of credit institutions and 
their functions in financing the needs of business enterprise. 
Three hours a week, spring quarter. Credit, three quarter 
hours. 

82. Business Statistics. An introduction to the statistical 
methods applied to business and economic data. Three hours 
a week, spring quarter. Credit, three quarter hours. 

EDUCATION AND PSYCHOLOGY 

Professor Marr 

All courses are accredited by the State Department of 
Education of Tennessee and may be used in satisfying state 
requirements for the different state certificates. 

1. (a, b, c) Elementary School Subjects. Materials, meth- 
ods, and supervised observation. Three hours a week through- 
out the year. Credit, nine quarter hours. 

4. (a, b) Art for the Grade School Child. State require- 
ment for elementary certificate. Three hours a week, winter 
and spring quarters. Credit, six quarter hours. 

6. Arithmetic for Elementary Teachers. Review of Grade 
School arithmetic. State requirement for elementary certifi- 
cate. Three hours a week fall quarter. Credit, three quarter 
hours. No credit toward a degree. 

25. Directed Teaching. Prerequisite : course 1, or its equiv- 
alent and scholastic average of C on previous college work. 



LAMBUTH COLLEGE 35 

Five hours a week of directed observation, participation and 
teaching in city schools for eighteen weeks. Begins in Sep- 
tember or January. Credit, three quarter hours. 

49. General Psychology. State requirement for teachers' 
certificates. Three hours a week, fall quarter. Credit, three 
quarter hours. 

51. Educational Psychology. Prerequisite: Education 49. 
Three hours a week, spring quarter. Credit, three quarter 
hours. 

52. Adolescent Psychology. Prerequisite: Education 49. 
Three hours a week, winter quarter. Credit, three quarter 
hours. 

53. Child Psychology. Prerequisite: Education 49. Three 
hours a week, winter quarter. Credit, three quarter hours. 

54. History of Education. Three hours a week, fall quar- 
ter. Credit, three quarter hours. 

55. Principles of Secondary Education. Three hours a 
week, fall quarter. Credit, three quarter hours. 

56. Tests and Measurements. Three hours a week, spring 
quarter. Credit, three quarter hours. 

60. Social Psychology. Prerequisite: Education 49 and 
Sociology 51, or their equivalents. Three hours a week, winter 
quarter. Credit, three quarter hours. 

75. Methods of Teaching Commercial Subjects. This course 
deals with the psychology of skill subjects and the methods 
and materials of teaching shorthand, typewriting and book- 
keeping. Three hours a week, on demand. Credit, three quar- 
ter hours. Professor Palmer. 

76. Materials and Methods in High School English. Open 
to English majors and minors who intend to qualify as teach- 
ers. Fall quarter. Three hours a week. Credit, three quarter 
hours. Professor S. V. Clement. 

77. Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages. A study of 
the aims, objectives, and methods of foreign language teaching 
in the secondary schools. Required of all students expecti^- 
to teach languages in high school. Winter quarter. Three hours 
a week. Credit, three quarter hours. Professor Evans. 

78. Historical Methods. Methods of reading, studying and 
teaching history. Methods of preserving and using historical 
materials. Winter quarter. Three hours a week. Credit, three 
quarter hours. Professor Eagle. 



36 CATALOGUE OF 

79. Methods of Teaching Home Economics. Three hours a 
week. Credit, three quarter hours. Offered on demand. 

Professor Womack. 

80. Methods of Teaching Mathematics in the High School. 
Required of all who intend to teach high school mathematics. 
Three hours a week, spring quarter. On demand. Credit, three 

Professor Pulliam. 

81. Methods of Teaching Music in the High School. Same 
as Music 52. Professor Thompson. 

82. Methods of Teaching Science in the High School. 
Aspects of classroom and laboratory teaching and planning 
are dealt with. Three hours a week, fall quarter. Credit, 
three quarter hours. Offered on demand. Professor Oxley. 

83. The Teaching of Social Science. A study of teaching 
Social Science and Business Administration in the high school. 
Three hours a week, winter quarter. On demand. Credit, three 
quarter hours. Professor Palmer. 

ENGLISH 

Professor S. V. Clement 

1. (a, b, c) Composition and Rhetoric. A study of funda- 
mentals in English. For freshmen. Three hours a week 
throughout the year. This course is not accepted in fulfill- 
ment of major or minor requirements. Credit, nine quarter 
hours. 

25. (a, b, c) Survey of English and American Literature. 

Prerequisite : English 1 or its equivalent. Three hours a week 
throughout the year. Credit, nine quarter hours. Required 
for elementary teachers' certificate. 

35. Children's Literature. An interpretative and critical 
study of various types of children's literature. Prerequisite: 
English 1 and sophomore standing. Open to freshmen who are 
candidates for the elementary teachers' certificate. Spring 
quarter. Three hours a week. Credit, three quarter hours. Not 
offered 1946-47. 

50. (a, b) Shakespeare's Plays. Three hours a week. 
Credit, six quarter hours. 50b not offered 1946-47. 

51. (a, b, c) Journalism. Basic instruction and practice 
in gathering, developing, and writing of news copy according 
to standard newspaper requirements. Special attention will 
be given to routine assignments, covering spot news, prepar- 
ing feature articles, and writing book reviews. Three hours 



LAMBUTH COLLEGE 37 



a week throughout the year. Prerequisite : English 1 (a, b, c) 
or its equivalent. Credit, nine quarter hours. Mrs. Melzer. 

55. Contemporary Drama. Credit, three quarter hours. 
Not offered 1946-47. 

56. (a, b) Contemporary American Prose. Three hours a 
week throughout winter and spring quarters. Credit, six 
quarter hours. 

60. (a, b, c) Advanced Composition. Required of all 
English majors. Prerequisite : English 1 and junior standing. 
Two hours a week throughout the year. Credit, six quarter 
hours. Not offered in 1946-47. 

75. Age of Milton. Prerequisite : English 1 and nine hours 
of credit in literature courses. Two hours a week. Credit, 
two quarter hours. 

76. The Romantic Period. Prerequisite : English 1 and nine 
hours of credit in literature courses. Two hours a week. Credit, 
two quarter hours. Not offered 1946-47. 

77. Victorian Age. Prerequisite : English 1 and nine hours 
of credit in literature courses. Two hours a week. Credit, 
two quarter hours. 

78. Modern Poetry. Prerequisite : English 1 and nine hours 
of credit in literature courses. Two hours a week. Credit, two 
quarter hours. 

80. (a, b) Literary Criticism (Formerly Modern Study of 
Literature.) Three hours a week throughout the fall and 
winter quarters. Credit, six quarter hours. Not offered 1946-47. 

HISTORY 

Professor Eagle 

2. (a, b, c) European History. A general survey of west- 
ern European civilization. Three hours a week throughout the 
year. Credit, nine quarter hours. 

3. (a, b, c) History of the Americas. A general survey 
of the Western Hemisphere from the discovery to the present 
time. Three hours a week throughout the year. Credit, nine 
quarter hours. 

24. (a, b, c) Current History. Study and discussion of 
current events. Fall, winter and spring quarters. Once a week. 
Credit, one quarter hour for any quarter. 

50. (a, b, c) History of England. A general survey of the 



38 CATALOGUE OF 

political, economic, social and cultural development of the 
English people. Three hours a week throughout the year. 
Credit, nine quarter hours. Not offered in 1946-47. 

51. Renaissance and Reformation. Fall quarter. Four hours 
a week. Credit, four quarter hours. 

52. Revolutionary and Independent Latin America. Win- 
ter quarter. Three hours a week. Credit, three quarter hours. 

53. Westward Expansion. Spread of population westward 
in the Anglo-American colonies and the United States. Spring 
quarter. Three hours a week. Credit, three quarter hours. 
Not offered in 1946-47. 

55. Post-War Problems. Three hours a week. Credit, three 
quarter hours. Not offered in 1946-47. 

75. (a, b) Economic History of the United States. Fall 

and winter quarters. Three hours a week. Credit, six quarter 
hours. Not offered in 1946-47. 

76. Inter-American Relations. Relations between the United 
States and Latin America. Spring quarter. Three hours a week. 
Credit, three quarter hours. 

HOME ECONOMICS 

Professor Womack 

These courses have been planned with emphasis on home and 
family life. Those interested in teaching the subject will be 
able to meet the requirements for a high school certificate. 

10. (a, b, c) Current Home Economics. Required of all 
Home Economics majors and minors. One hour a week through- 
out the year. Credit, three quarter hours. 

15. (a) Food Preparation. Fall quarter. Four hours lab- 
oratory, one hour lecture a week. Credit, three quarter hours. 

(b) Food Preparation. Prerequisite: 15 (a). Winter 
quarter. Four hours laboratory, one hour lecture a week. 
Credit, three quarter hours. 

(c) Meal Planning and Table Service. Prerequisite: 
15 (a, b). Spring quarter. Four hours laboratory, one hour 
lecture a week. Credit, three quarter hours. 

25. Textiles. Fall quarter. Three hours a week. Credit, 
three quarter hours. 

26. Principles of Art and Design. A prerequisite for 
courses No. 27, 28, 50 and 75. Winter quarter. Three hours 
a week. Credit, three quarter hours. 



LAMBUTH COLLEGE 39 



27. Elementary Dressmaking. Spring quarter. Four hours 
laboratory and one hour lecture a week. Credit, three quarter 
hours. 

28. Costume Design. Fall quarter. Prerequisite : 25, 26, 27. 
Four hours laboratory and one hour lecture a week. Credit, 
three quarter hours. 

50. Advanced Clothing. Winter quarter. Prerequisites: 
25, 26, 27, 28. Four hours laboratory, one hour lecture a week. 
Credit, three quarter hours. 

55. Nutrition. Fall quarter. Three hours a week. Credit, 
three quarter hours. 

56. Red Cross Home Nursing. Offered by Red Cross rep- 
resentative. Fall quarter. Three hours a week. Credit, three 
quarter hours. 

75. Home Furnishings. Winter quarter. Three hours a 
week. Credit, three quarter hours. 

76. Practice in Home Management. Each student majoring 
in Home Economics will be required to do six weeks of practice 
housekeeping in the dormitory. Prerequisite: 15 (a, b, c). 
Spring quarter. Credit, three quarter hours. 

77. Infant Care. Spring quarter. Three hours a week. 
Credit, three quarter hours. Offered alternate years. Offered 
in 1946-47. 

MATHEMATICS 

Professor Pulliam 

Students majoring in Mathematics must include three quar- 
ters of Mathematics 60 in their course. 

Students minoring in Mathematics must include two quar- 
ters of Mathematics 25 in their course. 

1. College Algebra. Prerequisite : one unit of high school 
algebra, and plane geometry. Fall quarter. Five hours a 
week. Credit, five quarter hours. 

2. Plane Trigonometry. Prerequisite: same as for Mathe- 
matics 1. Winter quarter. Five hours a week. Credit, five 
quarter hours. 

3. Analytic Geometry. Prerequisite: Mathematics 1 and 
2. Spring quarter. Five hours a week. Credit, five quarter 
hours. 

10. (a, b, c) Basic Mathematics. A college survey course 



40 CATALOGUE OF 

which traces the development and application of mathematics 
from abacus to calculus. Designed only for liberal arts students 
who do not expect to use mathematics as a major or minor 
subject. Three hours a week throughout the year. Credit, 
nine quarter hours. 

25. (a, b, c) Differential and. Integral Calculus. Pre- 
requisite: Mathematics 3. Four hours a week throughout the 
year. Credit, twelve quarter hours. 

60. (a, b, c) Differential Equations. Prerequisite : Mathe- 
matics 25. Three hours a week throughout the year. Credit, 
nine quarter hours. 

MODERN LANGUAGES 

Professor Evans 
Professor K. Clement 

FRENCH 

1. (a, b, c) Beginning French. The fundamentals of the 
language and the reading of easy French. Three hours a week 
throughout the year. Credit, nine quarter hours. 

25. (a, b, c) Second Year French. Grammar review and 
reading of representative French classics. Three hours a week 
throughout the year. Credit, nine quarter hours. 

50. (a, b, c) French Drama. Includes classic, romantic, 
modern periods. Prerequisite: two years of college French or 
equivalent. Three hours a week throughout the year. Credit, 
nine quarter hours. Not offered in 1946-1947. 

51. (a, b, c) The French Novel. Prerequisite: two years 
of college French, or the equivalent. Three hours a week 
throughout the year. Credit, nine quarter hours. 

75. (a, b, c) Victor Hugo; Balzac; Maeterlinck. Prereq- 
uisite : advanced standing. Three hours a week throughout the 
year. Credit, nine quarter hours. Not offered in 1946-1947. 

77. (a, b, c) Survey Course in French Literature. Pre- 
requisite: advanced standing. Three hours a week through- 
out the year. Credit, nine quarter hours. Not offered in 1946- 
1947. 

78. (a, b, c) Modern French Literature. A study of French 
literature of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Prereq- 
uisite : advanced standing. Three hours a week. Credit, nine 
quarter hours. Not offered in 1946-1947. 

79. (a, b, c) Advanced French Composition. Oral and 
written. Prerequisite : advanced standing. Two hours a week 



LAMBUTH COLLEGE 41 



throughout the year. Credit, six quarter hours. 



GERMAN 

1. (a, b, c) Beginning German. A study of the funda- 
mentals of the language and the reading of easy German. 
Three hours a week throughout the year. Credit, nine quarter 
hours. Not offered in 1946-1947. 

25. (a, b, c) Second Year German. Continued linguistic 
study and the reading of standard German literature. Three 
hours a week throughout the year. Credit, nine quarter hours. 

SPANISH 

1. (a, b, c) Beginning Spanish. A study of the funda- 
mentals of the language and the reading of easy Spanish. 
Three hours a week throughout the year. Credit, nine quarter 
hours. 

25. (a, b, c) Second Year Spanish. Continued linguistic 
study and the reading of representative Spanish literature, 
with the emphasis on Spanish-American culture. Three hours 
a week throughout the year. Credit, nine quarter hours. 

50. (a, b, c) Third Year Spanish. The reading of stand- 
ard Spanish literature, and continued linguistic study with a 
view to developing an active command of the language. Three 
hours a week throughout the year. Credit, nine quarter hours. 
Not offered in 1946-1947. 

51. (a, b, c) Survey Course in Spanish Literature. A 

study of the literature of Continental Spain from the Golden 
Age to the present day. Prerequisite: advanced standing. 
Three hours a week throughout the year. Credit, nine quarter 
hours. 

75. (a, b, c) Fourth Year Spanish. Continued study in oral 
and written composition and the reading of standard Spanish 
and Spanish-American literature. Prerequisite: advanced 
standing. Three hours a week throughout the year. Credit, 
nine quarter hours. Not offered in 1946-1947. 

76. Spanish Conversation. Prerequisite: advanced stand- 
ing. Drill and practice in oral Spanish, with a view to devel- 
oping conversational ability. Credit, three quarter hours. 
Not offered in 1946-1947. 



42 CATALOGUE OF 

MUSIC 

Professor Thompson, Director 
Professor Fossey 

Requirements for a Major in Music 

Applied Music 12 hours 

Chorus 3 hours 

Theory 9 hours 

Music History and Appreciation 9 hours 

Sight Singing 3 hours 

Music electives to be selected from Music 8, 10, 32, 51, 

52, 60, 65, 75 and 76 12 hours 



48 hours 



All music majors and minors are required to attend recitals 
and give a written criticism of them. 

Piano 1 and 2. Elements of pianoforte playing, including 
technique, notation, and rhythm study; simple scales, major, 
minor, and broken chords; a limited number of studies by 
representative composers; sonatines and rondos by Clementi, 
Kuhlau, Reinecke, Gurlitt, and others ; smaller compositions by 
Handel, Bach, Mozart, Beethoven, and others ; selections from 
the earlier works of Schumann, Grieg, Kullak and modern 
standard composers. Two lessons, and six or twelve hours of 
practice each week throughout the year. Credit, three or six 
quarter hours. Beginners credit not to exceed three quarter 
hours. 

Piano 3 and 4. Further development of technique, including 
major and minor scales in various forms, chords, arpeggios, 
octaves, etc. ; preludes and inventions by Bach ; sonatas and 
selections from Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven and others ; a limited 
number of etudes by Heller, Czerny, Duvernoy, Loeschhorn; 
easier compositions by Mendelssohn, Schubert, Schumann, 
Chopin, Grieg and selections from modern standard composers. 
Two lessons, and six or twelve hours of practice each week 
throughout the year. Credit, three, or six quarter hours. 

Voice 1 and 2. Fundamentals : correct breathing, sustained 
tones, correct pronunciation, tone color, interpretation of 
simple songs. Two lessons, and six or twelve hours of practice 
throughout the year. Credit, three or six quarter hours. Be- 
ginners credit not to exceed three quarter hours. 

Voice 3 and 4. Further development of voice placement, 
scales, etc. Sieber, Concone, Lutgen, Vaccai, simple songs in 
English, French, and Italian. Study of the opera and oratorio. 



LAMBUTH COLLEGE 43 

Two lessons, and six or twelve hours of practice a week 
throughout the year. Credit, three or six quarter hours. 

3. (a, b, c) Theory. Three hours a week throughout the 
year. Credit, nine quarter hours. 

6. (a, b, c) Sight Singing. Drill and training in easier 
sight reading, scale, interval and rhythmic drill. Study of 
unison, two and three part songs. Two hours a week through- 
out the year. Three quarter hours credit. Required of all 
music majors and minors. 

8. (a, b, c) Choral Conducting. Two hours a week 
throughout the year. Credit, six quarter hours. 

9. (a, b, c) History and Appreciation of Music. Biog- 
raphical and appreciative study of the lives and writings of 
the classical, romantic, and early modern composers; general 
survey of the development of the art of music. Three hours 
a week throughout the year. Credit, nine quarter hours. 

10. Hymnology. A study of the history and use of church 
music. Spring quarter. Three hours a week. Credit, three 
quarter hours. 

24. (a, b, c) Choir. Same as Choir 25 except students are 
not required to make trips. Two hours a week throughout the 
year. Credit, one and one half quarter hours. 

25. (a, b, c) Choir. Study and interpretation of a wide 
range of choral literature. Two hours a week throughout the 
year. Credit, three quarter hours. 

32. Public School Music. Completion of the course requires 
facility in reading at sight with Latin syllables and with text, 
the music in the standard texts as used in the elementary 
schools. Three hours a week for spring quarter. Credit, three 
quarter hours. 

51. (a, b, c) Harmony. Three hours a week throughout 
the year. Credit, nine quarter hours. 

52. Methods of Teaching Music in the High School. This 

course includes the study of organization of music clubs, con- 
ducting choral ensembles; and the direction and presentation 
of cantatas and operettas. Special attention will be given to 
materials and methods for music appreciation. Three hours 
per week. Credit, three quarter hours. On demand. 

60. (a, b, c) Advanced Sight Singing. Further training 
in sight reading. Study of three and four part songs. Two 



44 CATALOGUE OF 



hours a week throughout the year. Credit, three quarter hours. 
Prerequisite 6 (a, b, c) or its equivalent. 

65. (a, b, c) Advanced Harmony. Three hours a week 
throughout the year. Credit, nine quarter hours. 

75. Form and Analysis. Analysis of forms and of the 
harmonic and contrapuntal material found in selected works 
of Bach, Beethoven, Schumann, Chopin, Liszt, Wagner, etc. 
One hour a week throughout the year. Credit, three quarter 
hours. 

76. Music Methods. General principles of voice or piano 
pedagogy, psychology, aesthetics, teaching materials, music 
terminology, general discussions covering all phases of teach- 
ing. Three hours a week. Spring quarter. Credit, three quar- 
ter hours. 

CERTIFICATE COURSES IN MUSIC 

Students of Piano or Voice who desire to take two years in 
college music and who, for any reason, do not care to work 
toward a degree may take either of the following courses lead- 
ing to a certificate. Those who enter either of these courses 
must meet college entrance requirements. 

The two-year course in music leads to a certificate and meets 
the requirements of the first two years of Bachelor of Music 
degree. Certificates will be awarded in Piano and Voice. 

Curriculum Leading to a Certificate with Instrumental Major 

Freshman Year 

Applied Music 12 hours 

*Harmony 1 9 hours 

Sight Singing 3 hours 

Chorus 3 hours 

History and Music Appreciation 9 hours 

English 9 hours 

College or Music Electives 3 hours 

Sophomore Year 

Applied Music 12 hours 

Harmony II 9 hours 

Choral Conducting 6 hours 

Music Methods 3 hours 

Form and Analysis 3 hours 

Chorus 3 hours 



LAMBUTH COLLEGE 45 

College Electives 9 hours 

College or Music Electives 3 hours 

Curriculum Leading to a Certificate with Voice Major 
Freshman Yearf 

Applied Music ...12 hours 

Sight Singing 3 hours 

*Harmony I 9 hours 

History and Music Appreciation 9 hours 

Chorus 3 hours 

English 9 hours 

College or Music Electives 3 hours 

Sophomore Year 

Applied Music 12 hours 

Harmony II 9 hours 

Choral Conducting 6 hours 

Music Methods 3 hours 

Form and Analysis 3 hours 

Chorus 3 hours 

Foreign Languages 9 hours 

College or Music Electives 3 hours 

Public recital required upon completion of certificate course. 

A. Piano. Czerny Opus 740 and Cramer etudes, selected; 
Bach, three part inventions, French suites, Well-tempered 
Clavichord; Beethoven sonatas equivalent in difficulty to 
Opus 2, No. 1, Opus 14, No. 1, selections from classical and 
romantic schools of similar grades. Two lessons and eighteen 
hours practice each week throughout the year. Credit, twelve 
quarter hours. 

A. Voice. Elements of vocal culture, correct breathing, 
breath control, voice placing, pure vowels, scales, arpeggios, 
rhythm vocalises, Sieber, Concone, Marchesi, Lamperti, Vaccai, 
simple English and Italian songs, training for concert, opera, 
and oratorio and study of repertory in English, French, Italian, 
and German. Two lessons a week and assigned practice 
throughout the year. Credit, twelve quarter hours. 

B. Piano. Etudes of grade of Clementi Gradus of special 

♦Theory or its equivalent is required as a pre-requisite for Harmony I. 
Students who cannot pass an examination in Theory will be required to take 
Theory without credit toward a certificate. 

t Piano 1 without credit is required of Voice Majors who have not com- 
pleted this course or its equivalent. 



46 CATALOGUE OF 

technical training; Bach, English suites, Well-tempered Clavi- 
chord ; sonatas equivalent to Mozart No. 18, C Minor, Beethoven 
Opus 2, Nos. 2 and 3, Opus 7, Opus 10, No. 3, Opus 26 ; selec- 
tions from classical and romantic schools. Two lessons and 
eighteen hours practice each week throughout year. Credit, 
twelve quarter hours. 

B. Voice. Sustained tones, laws of interpretation, expres- 
sion, tone color, correct pronunciation; major and broken 
chords, diminished and dominant seventh broken chords; the 
classical school, simpler arias of Handel, Gluck, Mozart, Scar- 
latti, Pergolese, Cesti; German Lieder, Schubert, Schumann, 
Franz; French songs; Lully, Wekerlin, Berlois; modern 
English and American songs. Two lessons and assigned prac- 
tice each week throughout the year. Credit, twelve quarter 
hours. 

Music Fees 

Music fees for regular college students are listed below : 

Mr. Thompson 8 lessons for $12.00 

Mrs. Fossey 8 lessons for $12.00 

Assistants 8 lessons for $ 8.00 

These fees are payable to the instructor. 

Fees for use of practice piano are listed on page 14. 



PHILOSOPHY 

Professor J. H. Melzer 

25. (a, b, c) Basic Reasoning. The basic forms of correct 
reasoning leading to actual practice in argumentation and 
criticism are studied. This course is especially designed for 
pre-legal students. Credit, nine quarter hours. (Offered in 
1945-46 as Philosophy 1 (a, b) Logic.) 

30. (a, b, c) American Political Philosophy. Same as 
Political Science 30. Credit, nine quarter hours. 

50. (a, b, c) History of Philosophy. Fall quarter, Greek 
philosophy; winter quarter, medieval philosophy; spring quar- 
ter, modern philosophy. Credit, nine quarter hours. 

75. (a, b, c) Ethics. Same as Religion 75. Credit, nine 
quarter hours. 

80. (a, b) Philosophy of Religion. Same as Religion 80. 
Credit, six quarter hours. 



LAMBUTH COLLEGE 47 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Charles G. Phelps, Jr., Director 

1. (a, b, c) General Physical Education. Two hours a 
week throughout the year. Credit, three quarter hours. 

2. Plays and Games. Theory and practice of the games that 
are of interest to elementary pupils. Required for elementary 
certificates. Three hours a week, fall quarter. Credit, three 
quarter hours. 

PHYSICAL SCIENCE 
Acting Professor Raulins 

The courses offered by this department are intended to meet 
the cultural needs of the student and to give a pre-professional 
foundation for the study of medicine, agriculture, home 
economics, engineering and graduate study in the sciences. 
Students majoring in Chemistry will be required to take 
Physics 1, Biology 25, and Mathematics 1, 2. German 1 and 
25 and Mathematics 3 and 25 are also recommended, especially 
for those students who are interested in graduate study or in 
chemical engineering. 

Chemistry 

2. (a, b, c) General Chemistry. A pre-professional course. 
Three lectures and a minimum of two laboratory hours each 
week throughout the year. Credit, twelve quarter hours. 

31. Qualitative Analysis, Inorganic. Both theory and 
practice in the separation and identification of ions of salts, 
bases, acids, and elements. Prerequisite: Chemistry 2 (a, b, c). 
Fall quarter. Two lectures and a minimum of four laboratory 
hours each week. Credit, four quarter hours. 

32. Quantitative Analysis, Inorganic. Volumetric analysis. 
Prerequisite : Chemistry 31. Winter quarter. Two lectures 
and a minimum of four laboratory hours each week. Credit, 
four quarter hours. 

33. Quantitative Analysis, Inorganic. Gravimetric analy- 
sis. Prerequisites: Chemistry 31, 32. Spring quarter. Two 
lectures and a minimum of four laboratory hours each week. 
Credit, four quarter hours. 

61. (a, b, c) Organic Chemistry. A study of the com- 
pounds of carbon. Prerequisite: Chemistry 2 (a, b, c). Three 
lectures and a minimum of two laboratory hours each week 
throughout the year. Credit, twelve quarter hours. 



48 CATALOGUE OF 

71. Bio-Chemistry. For pre-medical students and Chemistry- 
majors. Prerequisites: Chemistry 2 (a, b, c), 31, 61. Two 
lectures and four laboratory hours each week. Credit, four 
quarter hours. Not offered in 1946-47. 

81. (a, b, c) Physical Chemistry. Prerequisites: Physics 
1, Mathematics 1, 2, 3, and 25, Chemistry 2 (a, b, c) and 31, 32, 
33 or 61. Two hours lecture and two laboratory hours each 
week. Credit, nine quarter hours. Offered on demand. 

91. (a, b, c) Organic Syntheses. Prerequisite: Chemistry 
61. The course may be carried for one, two, or three quarters. 
Four hours laboratory and conferences each week. Credit, two 
quarter hours per quarter. Offered on demand. 

General Physical Science 

1. (a, b, c) Introduction to Physical Science. A survey 
of Astronomy, Chemistry, Geology, and Physics. Three lectures 
each week throughout the year. Credit, nine quarter hours. 

Physics 

1, (a, b, c) General Physics. Mechanics, Heat, Light, 
Magnetism, Sound, and Electricity. Prerequisites : Mathematics 
1 and 2, or concurrent registration in either course. Three 
lectures and two laboratory hours each week throughout the 
year. Credit, twelve quarter hours. 

50. (a, b, c) Advanced Physics. Mechanics, Heat and 
Electricity. Prerequisites: Physics 1 and Mathematics 25. 
Three lectures and two laboratory hours each week throughout 
year. Credit, twelve quarter hours. Offered on demand. 

RELIGION 

Professor Neel 

1. (a, b, c) Introduction to the Bible. A survey of the 
Bible, the purpose of which is to familiarize the student with 
the central spiritual values of the Old and New Testaments. 
Three hours a week throughout the year. Credit, nine quarter 
hours. Recommended for the freshman or the sophomore year. 

25. (a, b) Christianity in its Early Years. Fall and win- 
ter quarters. Two hours a week. Credit, four quarter hours. 

31. The Old Testament Prophets. Spring quarter. Three 
hours a week. Credit, three quarter hours. Not offered in 
1946-47. 



LAMBUTH COLLEGE 49 



50. (a, b, c) Principles of Christian Education. Three 
hours a week throughout the year. Credit, nine quarter hours. 

55. (a, b, c) The Church and Contemporary Social Prob- 
lems. A study of the practical application of the Christian 
ethic to problems such as: labor-capital, race relations, mar- 
riage and the family, strategies of peace, and world brother- 
hood. Three hours a week throughout the year. Credit, nine 
quarter hours. 

60. (a, b, c) Church History. Two hours a week through- 
out the year. Credit, six quarter hours. 

65. Worship for Young People. Spring quarter. Two hours 
a week. Credit, two quarter hours. 

75. (a, b, c) Christian Ethics. Three hours a week 
throughout the year. Credit, nine quarter hours. 

80. (a, b) Introduction to the Philosophy of Religion. 
Open to sophomores by permission of the instructor. Three 
hours a week. Credit, six quarter hours. Not offered in 1946-47. 

SOCIAL SCIENCE 

Acting Professor Melzer 
Professor Palmer 

The courses in this department are designed for the purpose 
of introducing the student to, and giving him a fuller appre- 
ciation of, his relationships with his fellow man in his social, 
political and economic contacts, thus developing a more tolerant 
and cosmopolitan outlook. Students desiring to major or 
minor in this department should elect the following courses: 
Social Science 1 (a, b, c), Political Science 30 (a, b, c), Sociology 
51 (a, b), and Economics 50 (a, b, c). 

1. (a, b, c) Introduction to the Social Sciences. This 
course is designed to acquaint the student with the world of 
human relations in which he lives. Three hours a week 
throughout the year. Credit, nine quarter hours. Recom- 
mended in the freshman or the sophomore year. 

Economics 

25. (a, b, c). Economic Geography. Same as Business 
Administration 25 (a, b, c). 

50. (a, b, c) Principles of Economics. Study of the founda- 
mental economic principles of society and their application to 
the individual in his wealth-getting and wealth-using activities. 



50 CATALOGUE OF 

Prerequisite : 'Social Science 1, or the equivalent. Three hours 
a week throughout the year. Credit, nine quarter hours. 

55. Business Law. Same as Business Administration 55. 

Political Science 

30. (a, b, c) Government of the United States. (Same as 
Philosophy 30 (a, b, c). An analysis of the organization, 
structure, and operation of the national, state, and local gov- 
ernment of the United States. Three hours a week throughout 
the year. Credit, nine quarter hours. 

Sociology 

51. (a, b) Principles of Sociology. A brief introduction 
to the general principles governing the operation of the in- 
stitutions of society, and the place of the individual within the 
social order. Three hours a week throughout the fall and 
winter quarters. Credit, six quarter hours. Not offered 1946- 
47. 

52. (a, b) Social Problems. The fall quarter is devoted 
to a thorough study of the labor market and population move- 
ments. During the winter quarter the methods for the settling 
of labor-management disputes are studied. Credit, six quarter 
hours. 

55. Rural Sociology. Prerequisite : Sociology 51. A study 
of rural organization and the major social problems facing 
rural people. Three hours a week throughout the spring 
quarter. Credit, three quarter hours. Not offered 1945-46. 

60. The Family. A study of the family in its biological, 
social, and economic aspects ; its origin and development ; social 
change; and family disorganization and reorganization. Pre- 
requisite : Sociology 51, or its equivalent. Spring quarter. 
Three hours a week. Credit, three quarter hours. 

65. Social Psychology. Prerequisites: Education 49 and 
Sociology 1 or 51. See Psychology 60. Credit, three quarter 
hours. 

SPEECH AND DRAMATICS 

Professor Dorothy Melzer 

1. (a, b, c) Public Speaking. A course designed to give 
the student thorough training in public speaking. Three hours 
a week throughout the year. Credit, nine quarter hours. 



LAMBUTH COLLEGE 51 



25. Advanced Speech. Advanced individual training for 
particular vocational situations. Prerequisite: Speech 1 
(a, b, c). Fall quarter, three hours a week. Credit, three 
quarter hours. 

35. (a, b). Dramatics. A course in the various aspects of 
play production for school, church, and community theatres. 
Acting, casting, lighting, back-stage organization. Plays 
studied and produced. Two recitations and two laboratory 
hours, winter and spring quarters. Credit, six quarter hours. 



52 CATALOGUE OF 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 

SUMMER SESSION, 1945 

Archibald, Paul L Jackson, Tenn. 

Arnold, Mrs. Verona Sullivan Camden, Tenn. 

Belew, Martha Atwood, Tenn. 

Bond, Betty Jackson, Tenn. 

Bove, Virgilio Cienfuegos, Cuba 

Broadus, L. L Beech Bluff, Tenn. 

Cox, Alice Jane Medina, Tenn. 

Eisinger, Bettye Oakland, Tenn. 

Evans, Sara Jane Jackson, Tenn. 

Farrow, Lawrence Bells, Tenn. 

Fletcher, H. C Adamsville, Tenn. 

Forsythe, Catherine Rone Humboldt, Tenn. 

Gean, Jimmie Adamsville, Tenn. 

Harrison, Marshall Jackson, Tenn. 

Hudson, Joethel Humboldt, Tenn. 

Jefferies, Bess Katharine Jackson, Tenn. 

Jones, Marye Evelyn Bemis, Tenn. 

Luten, Carolyn Hickman, Ky. 

McAdams, Annie Jack 's Creek, Tenn. 

McCormack, Geraldine Corinth, Miss. 

McKelvy, George Franklin Memphis, Tenn. 

McKinnie, Ernest Wesley Jackson, Tenn. 

McLemore, Robert B Jackson, Tenn. 

Mathes, Mrs. J. T Toccoa Falls, Ga. 

Mayo, Frances Springfield, Tenn. 

Miller, John... Paris, Tenn. 

Moore, S. D Jackson, Tenn. 

Seaton, Elizabeth Adamsville, Tenn. 

Seavers, Ray Nell Jackson, Tenn. 

Sharp, Emily Jackson, Tenn. 

Simpson, Billy Jackson, Tenn. 

Stout, Nancy Jean Jackson, Tenn. 

Truett, Bessie L Jackson, Tenn. 

Upton, Juil Ridgely, Tenn. 

White, James L Oakfield, Tenn. 

Williams, Dorothy Bethel Springs, Tenn. 

Williams, J. Neal Adamsville, Tenn. 

Wilson, Evelyn Fort Worth, Texas 

Yelton, Nancy Jackson, Tenn. 



LAMBUTH COLLEGE 53 



REGULAR SESSION, 1945-1946 

FRESHMAN CLASS 

Aiken, Ruby Irene Connelly Springs, N. C. 

Allen, Cordis Barker Bath Springs, Tenn. 

Bailey, Thomas Joe Reagan, Tenn. 

Bayles, Charles Wesley , Jackson, Tenn. 

Bayles, Wayne W Jackson, Tenn. 

Bell, Jeremiah Emerson Jackson, Tenn. 

Bickley, Claude A., Jr Jackson, Tenn. 

Blackwood, Jimmy Somerville, Tenn. 

Blalock, Ralph Somerville, Tenn. 

Byrd, Ward, Jr Corinth, Miss. 

Campbell, Marian Marie Jackson, Tenn. 

Carothers, Robert Paul Memphis, Tenn. 

Carpenter, Juanita Traylor Memphis, Tenn. 

Cooper, Evelyn Shirley Jackson, Tenn. 

Daniel, Frank Levi Gleason, Tenn. 

Davis, J. C Pinson, Tenn. 

Donahue, Ethel Perl Gallup, New Mexico 

Essary, Christine Trezevant, Tenn. 

Evans, Sue Milburn, Ky. 

Ferguson, Billie Faye Lexington, Tenn. 

Gage, Ada Joyce Kaeker Milan, Tenn. 

George, Lanelle .' Trenton, Tenn. 

Giles, Sarah Helon Jackson, Tenn. 

Gillespie, Mariellen Kerrville, Tenn. 

Gladish, Anna Lawrenceburg, Tenn. 

Goldsmith, Betty Maurine Memphis, Tenn. 

Goodman, Mary Laudine Camden, Tenn. 

Graves, Mary Ann Humboldt, Tenn. 

Gray, Alta D eLoy ce Michie, Tenn. 

Hankins, Jean Carmen Jackson, Tenn. 

Harder, Eddye Mildred Linden, Tenn. 

Harris, Charles Lee Humboldt, Tenn. 

Haun, Cecil R Humboldt, Tenn. 

Hays, Mary Frances Jackson, Tenn. 

Hazlewood, Harry Humboldt, Tenn. 

Heaberg, Sarah Joanne Hattiesburg, Miss. 

Helms, Virginia Reagan, Tenn. 

Hines, Maurice Allen Bemis, Tenn. 

Hood, Rebecca Brownsville, Tenn. 

Hopper, Martha Carolyn Jackson, Tenn. 

Horton, David Memphis, Tenn. 

Huber, Kathryn Dee Memphis, Tenn. 

Jackson, W. T _ jSardis, Tenn. 



54 CATALOGUE OF 

Jones, Mary Jane _ Jackson, Tenn. 

King_, Paschal Alexander Jackson, Tenn. 

Lancaster, Betty Joyce Enville, Tenn. 

Lasley, Marjorie Rhodes Jackson, Tenn. 

Lassiter, Harold Kennith Jackson, Tenn. 

Law, Thomas M Jackson, Tenn. 

Lawrence, Swanee Jackson, Tenn. 

Lax, Margaret Louise Paducah, Ky. 

Liggett, Hollis Samuel Jackson, Tenn. 

Loveless, Dorothy Jean .Memphis, Tenn. 

McFarland, Mary Ellen Memphis, Tenn. 

McKinnie, Ernest Wesley Jackson, Tenn. 

McKnight, Alfred J Mason. Tenn. 

McSwain, Dorothy Memphis, Tenn. 

Mainers, William Shelby Medon, Tenn. 

Manuel, James Ellis Trenton, Tenn. 

Martin, Louise Reagan, Tenn. 

May, George Paul, Jr Barlow, Ky. 

Melton, Ray Jackson, Tenn. 

Messner, Kenneth Jackson, Tenn. 

Miller, Fred Alton Jackson, Tenn. 

Mitchell, Parker E Jackson, Tenn. 

Montgomery, Alta Ruth Oakfield, Tenn. 

Moore, Anne Carolyn Jackson, Tenn. 

Neisler, Romie Wilson Jackson, Tenn. 

Oliver, Faye Somerville, Tenn. 

Overall, Margaret Ann Humboldt, Tenn. 

Parker, Thelma Loraine Medon, Tenn. 

Pate, Billy 'Neal Jackson. Tenn. 

Perrigan, William Murray Jackson, Tenn. 

Pettigrew, Wyatt Dean Bemis, Tenn. 

Pettigrew, Anita June Jackson, Tenn. 

Phelps, Josephine Greenbrier, Tenn. 

Pruett, Julian Humboldt, Tenn. 

Riddick, Margaret Delitha Dyersburg, Tenn. 

Rike, Bettie Jean Williston, Tenn. 

Ross, Ann Lee Munford, Tenn. 

Russell, William Kennith Paducah, Ky. 

Saunders, Marion Ray Camden, Tenn. 

Seaton, Roxie Elizabeth (Mrs. Roy Garrison), Adamsville, Tenn. 

Simpson, Billy Leon Jackson, Tenn. 

Skipper, Norman Edwin .Bells, Tenn. 

Teer, William Marvin Bruceton, Tenn. 

Thornton, Ruth Taylor Brownsville, Tenn. 

Threadgill, Martha Janice Jackson, Tenn. 

Twomey, Martha Elizabeth Jackson, Tenn. 

Vance, Carolyn Memphis, Tenn. 

Vaughan, Hugh Wynn Camden, Tenn. 



LAMBUTH COLLEGE 55 

Walker, Lula Frances Brownsville, Tenn. 

Walker, Eaymond Wilson Trenton, Tenn. 

Wheatley, William Dual Camden, Tenn. 

Whitaker, Ruth Michie, Tenn. 

White, Bessie Geraldean Decaturville, Tenn. 

White, Mary Johnson Milan, Tenn. 

Wiggins, Wesley Wayne Memphis, Tenn. 

Wilkins, Rose Barton Memphis, Tenn. 

Willis, James Albert Elbridge, Tenn. 

Wortham, Mary Frances Arlington, Ky. 

SOPHOMORE CLASS 

Allen, Margaret Juanita Memphis, Tenn. 

Allen, Margaret Warlick Memphis, Tenn. 

Berry, Mary Ruth Morris Chapel, Tenn. 

Bryant, James M Bells, Tenn. 

Burnette, Zilpha Mae Paducah, Ky. 

Calhoun, Dick Jackson, Tenn. 

Carothers, Alpha Louise Memphis, Tenn. 

Cathey, Willie Vivian Jackson, Tenn. 

Davis, Dorothy Nell Trenton, Tenn. 

Dismuke, Joy Pinson, Tenn. 

Dodson, Dorothy Alamo, Tenn. 

Dunne, Joseph Lawrence Jackson, Tenn. 

Echols, James Phillip Jackson, Tenn. 

Fesmire, Isaac Warren Humboldt, Tenn. 

Forsythe, Catherine Rone Humboldt, Tenn. 

Gilbert, Rebecca Obion, Tenn. 

Griffin, Emily Carey Jackson, Tenn. 

Jones, Marye Evelyn Bemis, Tenn. 

Livingston, Jesse James Silerton, Tenn. 

Looney, Addison Clemons Jackson, Tenn. 

McAdams, Annie Ainsworth Jack's Creek, Tenn. 

McGowan, Ellen Fossey Jackson, Tenn. 

McLemore, Robert Burke Jackson, Tenn. 

Moorhead, Joseph William, Jr Jackson, Tenn. 

Myers, Elma Katherine Corinth, Miss. 

Pafford, Mildred Sue Hollow Rock, Tenn. 

Reynolds, Beatrice Isabel Jackson, Tenn. 

Stout, Nancy Jean Jackson, Tenn. 

Thurmond, Enos Cyrus, Jr Bemis, Tenn. 

Townsend, Beverly Jackson, Tenn. 

Upton, Juil Fulton, Ky. 

Utley, Robert Vernon Medina, Tenn. 

Weaver, Carolyn Riverdale, Kan. 

Weaver, Marion Elizabeth Riverdale, Kan. 



56 CATALOGUE OF 

White, James Louis Oakfield, Term. 

Williams, Jennings Bryan, Jr Jackson, Tenn. 

Yelton, Nancy Jackson, Tenn. 

JUNIOR CLASS 

Baker, Mary Frances Selmer, Tenn. 

Barker, Lena Katherine Jackson, Tenn. 

Beare, Evelyn Weatherly Jackson, Tenn. 

Bell, Marian Lucille Dyersburg, Tenn. 

Berryhill, Alicia Anne Jackson, Tenn. 

Bingham, Arthur Nowell Jackson, Tenn. 

Davis, Richard E Trenton, Tenn. 

Echols, Earlean McFarland Jackson, Tenn. 

Frye, Stanley Jackson, Tenn. 

Graham, Joy Emerson Somerville, Tenn. 

Herron, Marjorie Jackson, Tenn. 

Hilliard, Thomasine Jackson, Tenn. 

Holmes, Elizabeth Inez Memphis, Tenn. 

Jones, Frances Catherine Jackson, Tenn. 

McKelvy, George Franklin Humboldt, Tenn. 

McKnight, Virginia Elaine Jackson, Tenn. 

McSwain, Warren Stewart ....Puryear, Tenn. 

Rollins, Robert Clyde Jackson, Tenn. 

Shires, William Archer _ Jackson, Tenn. 

Smith, Ernest Binf ord Trenton, Tenn. 

Thompson, Martha Collins Paris, Tenn. 

Townsend, Harrell Alvin Huntingdon, Tenn. 

Trevathan, Corleda Faye Gleason, Tenn. 

Tucker, LaVerne Parsons, Tenn. 

Wilford, Mary Beth Lexington, Tenn. 

SENIOR CLASS 

Archibald, Paul Lee Gates, Tenn. 

Black, Margaret Hickman, Ky. 

Cagle, Anna Louise Jackson, Tenn. 

Capps, John Albert Jackson, Miss. 

Cole, Edward Lee Jackson, Tenn. 

Cooper, Juanita Caroline Jackson, Tenn. 

Cox, Alice Jane Spring Creek, Tenn. 

Crook, Nancy Green Jackson, Tenn. 

Eagle, Ellen Jackson, Tenn. 

Eisinger, Bettye Irene Oakland, Tenn. 

Gilbert, Helen Obion, Tenn. 

Griffin, Thomas Elliott Whiteville, Tenn. 

Luten, Margaret Carolyn Hickman, Ky. 

McCormack, Sylvia Geraldine Corinth, Miss. 



LAMBUTH COLLEGE 57 



Menzies, Roger Bemis, Tenn. 

Messner, Sara R Jackson, Tenn. 

Miller, John Robert Paris, Tenn. 

Neisler, Frances Weaver Jackson, Tenn. 

Newberry, Marian Jackson, Tenn. 

Olhausen, John David Pinson, Tenn. 

Pafford, Juanita Hollow Rock, Tenn. 

Partin, James Austin Parsons, Tenn. 

Ryan, Joe Utley Jackson, Tenn. 

Seavers, Ray Nell Jackson, Tenn. 

Sharp, Emily Mai Jackson, Tenn. 

Standley, Frederick V Memphis, Tenn. 

Thomas, Mrs. A. M Jackson, Tenn. 

Torii, Mary Kawaii New York, New York 

Truett, Ellis R., Jr Jackson, Tenn. 

Truett, Mrs. Ellis R., Jr Jackson, Tenn. 

Vaughan, William M., Jr Camden, Tenn. 

Wallace, William Lynn, Jr Coldwater, Miss. 

Williams, James Neal -..Memphis, Tenn. 

Williams, Vera Dorothy Bethel Springs, Tenn. 

Witherspoon, James F Jackson, Tenn. 

SPECIAL STUDENTS 

Artiles, Luisa Lopez Cienfuegos, Cuba 

Bereman, Ronald Bemis, Tenn. 

Bove, Virgilio Cienfuegos, Cuba 

Broadus, Lars Lamar Malesus, Tenn. 

Fletcher, Harold C Adamsville, Tenn. 

Gage, Elliott M Milan, Tenn. 

Hoffman, John Quinton Jackson, Tenn. 

Hunt, Nannie May Jackson, Tenn. 

Martin, Dorothy Cobb Jackson, Tenn. 

Mays, Helen Pinson, Tenn. 

Moore, iSamuel Dickey Newbern, Tenn. 

Philpot, James David Jackson, Tenn. 

Souza, Lea Rio de Janiero, Brazil 

Spencer, Mrs. Mary T Jackson, Tenn. 

Stauffer, George Lester Jackson, Tenn. 

Stedman, Tommy Jackson, Tenn. 

Wilder, Windsor Jackson, Tenn. 

Wilkinson, Dorothy Mai Jackson, Tenn. 



Women 


Total 


20 


35 


16 


25 


24 


37 


54 


101 


7 


18 


121 


216 


24 


39 


145 


255 


15 


27 


130 


228 



58 CATALOGUE OF 

Summary of Enrollment 

1945-1946 

Regular Session Men 

Seniors 15 

Juniors 9 

Sophomores 13 

Freshmen 47 

Specials 11 

Total in Regular Session 95 

SUMMER SESSION 15 

Grand Total in Regular and 

Summer Sessions 110 

DUPLICATES 

Less Students Counted Twice 12 

Enrolled during Academic Year 98 

Alumni Directory- 
Class of 1927 

Bachelor of Arts 

Hilliard, T. Earle Hickman, Ky. 

Jolley, Cola Nelson Ripley, Tenn. 

Lamon, Lois Memphis, Tenn. 

Morelock, Constance (Mrs. Allen Wilson) Miami, Fla. 

Paff ord, Glendell Warren Jackson, Miss. 

Seissinger, Valdora Joyce (Mrs. William Soare) 

Roswell, New Mexico 

Warden, Anne With the Armed Forces 

Womack, Elma Lee (Mrs. Burns Hicks) Jackson, Tenn. 

Class of 1928 
Bachelor of Arts 

Baker, Cecil A Tiptonville, Tenn. 

Ballard, Betty (Mrs. Charles Carter) Memphis, Tenn. 

Banks, Eliza (Mrs. George A. Kennedy) Jewel Ridge, Va. 

Banks, Vernon E Big Sandy, Tenn. 

Leonard, Katherine (Mrs. Wilfred Stanfill) Jackson, Tenn. 

Lewis, Faye (Mrs. Guy S. Miles) Knoxville, Tenn. 

Malone, John Ed Adamsville, Tenn. 

O'Neal, Buford With the Armed Forces 

Overall, Dan R Jackson, Tenn. 

Threadgill, Helen (Mrs. Charles Ross) Lexington, Tenn. 

Taylor, David Alfred Kerrville, Tenn. 

Wade, Ruth (Mrs. Cecil A. Baker) Tiptonville, Tenn. 



LAMBUTH COLLEGE 59 



Walden, Herschel Milledgeville, Ga. 

Watt, Mildred Etoyle Jackson, Tenn. 

Class of 1929 
Bachelor of Arts 

Bailey, Bruce Edward Jackson, Tenn. 

Barnhill, Evelyn (Mrs. Joe Scruggs) Memphis, Tenn. 

Boren, Elizabeth Jackson, Tenn. 

Burnette, Earline (Mrs. C. M. Price) Williston, Tenn. 

Council, Raymond Ward McKenzie, Tenn. 

Gardner, James Robert Williamsburg, Ky. 

Gowan, Lois Virginia (Mrs. Enloe Turner) Chipley, Fla. 

Sanford, Marshall S..... Memphis, Tenn. 

Smith, Mae (Mrs. W. R. Reed) Jonesboro, Ark. 

Thompson, Willie Maude Melbourne, Pla. 

Wadsworth, Virginia (Mrs. John D. Whitley) Ripley, Tenn. 

Wilford, Eurie Pearl (Mrs. C. M. Neel) Paducah, Ky. 

Wilson, Raymond E San Antonio, Texas 

Womack, Helen Maye Jackson, Tenn. 

Class of 1930 
Bachelor of Arts 

Cherry, Wilma (Mrs. Hugh Moore) Jackson, Tenn. 

Evans, Samuel Clarence With the Armed Forces 

Fant, Louise Bernice (Mrs. Lynn Lewis) Jackson, Tenn. 

Hastings, Comer Henry With the Armed Forces 

Herron, Mary Anita (Mrs. Louis Howlett) Memphis, Tenn. 

Hicks, Elizabeth (Mrs. J. D. Harris) Jackson, Tenn. 

Hopper, Kathryn Elizabeth (Mrs. Kathryn Bass) Paris, Tenn. 

Hunt, Frances (Mrs. Weldon Oliver) Medina, Tenn. 

Kent, Jack Thurston A. & M. College, College Station, Texas 

Kiser, Buel Theodore Selmer, Tenn. 

Kiser, Grace Wood (Mrs. Buel T. Kiser) Selmer, Tenn. 

Lassiter, Virginia Lacy (Mrs. H. A. Kincannon), Jackson, Tenn. 

Mischke, Walter E Fulton, Ky. 

Moore, Nelle Elizabeth Henning, Tenn. 

Pontius, Rita (Mrs. P. J. Kerby) North Little Rock, Ark. 

Tomerlin, Gloria Pauline (Mrs. D. A. Ramsey) Mercer, Tenn. 

Young, James Doyne With the Armed Forces 

Class of 1931 
Bachelor of Arts 

Barrett, J. T Oakland, Tenn. 

Bledsoe, Leora Memphis, Tenn. 

Davis, A. L Milan, Tenn. 



60 CATALOGUE OF 



Ferguson, Allan B Memphis, Tenn. 

Flatt, F. A Paducah, Ky. 

Johnson J. Laurent Gainesville, Ga. 

Lassiter, Erin (Mrs. A. J. Moreno) Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Manning, Ruby (Mrs. Role Barnes) Bells, Tenn. 

Meriwether, Ruth (Mrs. D. C. Wakefield) Jackson, Tenn. 

Parham, Chester Jackson, Tenn. 

Reed, Jewell (Mrs. A. R. Tinker) Jackson, Tenn. 

Reid, Frances Jackson, Tenn. 

Samples, Anna Belle (Mrs. Clyde Bledsoe) Jackson, Tenn. 

Scott, J. S Ripley, Tenn. 

Threadgill, Coby (Mrs. Mason Conger) Lexington, Tenn. 

Tomerlin, Vernon Mercer, Tenn. 

Wadsworth, Reginald With the Armed Forces 

Walker, Aaron Dresden, Tenn. 

Class of 1932 
Bachelor of Arts 

Bagby, Steadman T Dyersburg, Tenn. 

*Bishop, Laura Jeanette 

Bradley, Vernon Wesley Watertown, Tenn. 

Brooks, Mary Louise (Mrs. John Cooper) Jackson, Tenn. 

Council, Lowell B Ridgely, Tenn. 

Evans, William Slaton Memphis, Tenn. 

Fenner, Mary Ann (Mrs. Carl Robbins) Selmer, Tenn. 

Gowan, Pansy May Jackson, Tenn. 

Hall, Henrietta (Mrs. M. E. Surrett) • Selmer, Tenn. 

Hastings, Emily (Mrs. Fred Clark) Jackson, Tenn. 

Jackson, Rubye (Mrs. J. Doyne Young) Paris, Tenn. 

Lassiter, Cornelia (Mrs. R. H. Arthurs) Cotton Plant, Ark. 

LeMond, E. Heustis Alamo, Tenn. 

Newsome, Harry H Brownsville, Tenn. 

O 'Hara, Butler With the Armed Forces 

O'Neal, Evelyn (Mrs. H. F. Baker) Jackson, Tenn. 

Rushing, Imogene (Mrs. 0. F. Linebarger) Greenwood, Miss. 

Sawyer, Ranville W. T Brookhaven, Miss. 

Smith, Burl M With the Armed Forces 

Stanfill, Charles Memphis, Tenn. 

Sweatman, Angie May Memphis, Tenn. 

Wadsworth, H. Manley Memphis, Tenn. 

Class of 1933 
Bachelor of Arts 

Arant, Guy Arlington, Tenn. 

Barnes, W. T Dresden, Tenn. 

♦Deceased. 



LAMBUTH COLLEGE 61 



Blackwell, Lucy White Jackson, Tenn. 

Cathey, Ruby Oakfield, Tenn. 

Dawson, Gladys Jackson, Tenn. 

Diggs, Edwin Newbern, Tenn. 

Foust, Lee Ola Tampa, Fla. 

Fowler, Anna Belle (Mrs. Russell Gooch) Davenport, Iowa 

Horton, Robert Memphis, Tenn. 

Love, Tom Birmingham, Ala. 

Mayes, Ben With the Armed Forces 

Miller, C. C Memphis, Tenn. 

Oliver, Weldon Medin a, Tenn. 

Pearigen, William Harris Calvert City, Ky. 

Smith, Evelyn Ruth Washington, D. C. 

Spangler, Sara (Mrs. John L. Armstrong) Somerville, Tenn. 

Stanley, Harold Brownsville, Tenn. 

Stanley, Wilma Ashland City, Tenn. 

Terry, Edward Nashville, Tenn. 

Tooms, Marylu (Mrs. Ellis Faulkner) Paragould, Ark. 

Weir, Orval With the Armed Forces 

Winslow, Elton Jackson, Tenn. 

Wrather, Donnie (Mrs. Edwin Foust) Helena, Ark. 

Class of 1934 
Bachelor of Arts 

Brown, Ruby Carey (Mrs. J. R. Crowe) Paducah, Ky. 

Cade, Dorothy H Ocean Springs, Miss. 

Caldwell, Ben Edd Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Dodds, Elsie Elizabeth (Mrs. Stephen Willis) 

Rutherford, Tenn. 

Evans, Daniel P - - Milan, Tenn. 

Foust, Edwin _ „ Helena, Ark. 

Haley, J. Hamilton _ „ Friendship , Tenn. 

Henry, Otis Granville „ _ Dallas, Texas 

Hillard, Irving Ringo With the Armed Forces 

Kendall, Margaret Elizabeth Pikeville, Tenn. 

Lyles, Paul Thomas _ _ _ Camden, Tenn. 

Mainord, Mary Louise - With the Armed Forces 

Matthews, Isabel (Mrs. Ernest Ball) Jackson, Tenn. 

Roach, Mary Elizabeth (Mrs. Rush Hankins) 

With the Armed Forces 

Robbins, Carl Maurice „ .iSelmer, Tenn. 

Smith, Alma (Mrs. Ed New) Jackson, Tenn. 

Smith, Mary Carolyn Knoxville, Tenn. 

Stalvey, John Knightdale, N. C. 

Ward, Lee Pope _ With the Armed Forces 

Womack, Hazel (Mrs. Moody Sims) Jackson, Miss. 



62 CATALOGUE OF 

York, Benjamin Preston Memphis, Tenn. 

Class of 1935 
Bachelor of Arts 

Armstrong, John Lee Somerville, Tenn. 

Binkley, David Washington With the Armed Forces 

Bradbury, Glenn With the Armed Forces 

Crowe, James K. Paducah, Ky. 

Dyer, Virginia Halls, Tenn. 

Evans, Sarah B Washington, D. C. 

Hinton, David E Erin, Tenn. 

Hopper, Mabel (Mrs. Kyle Webb) Jackson, Tenn. 

Howell, Weldon Young Paris, Tenn. 

Lassiter, Mary Jane Memphis, Tenn. 

Lockman, Frances L Jackson, Tenn. 

Mattox, James Doyle Chicago, 111. 

Nicholas, Edward I Miami, Fla. 

'Neal, Anna May Jackson, Tenn. 

Riddick, Thomas Stacy Greenfield, Tenn. 

Simms, Lyman Moody „ Jackson, Miss. 

Webb, John Luke Linden, Tenn. 

York, George Dupree Marksville, La. 

Class of 1936 
Bachelor of Arts 

Batts, Wavy E With the Armed Forces 

Cantrell, Evelyn Louise (Mrs. Joseph Spain) Jackson, Tenn. 

Carne, John Emerson With the Armed Forces 

DeShazo, Winifred Huntsman Humboldt, Tenn. 

England, James J With the Armed Forces 

Farris, Edgar D Brownsville, Tenn. 

Felts, Mac Howard Springfield, Tenn. 

Fiser, James Hinton Water Valley, Ky. 

Fisher, Russell -Sharon, Tenn. 

Foote, Nell (Mrs. W. H. DeShazo) Humboldt, Tenn. 

Googe, Frances Willard (Mrs. Bob Carithers) Dadeville, Ala. 

Harris, Eunice (Mrs. Elliott Murry) Jackson, Miss. 

Harwell, Aubrey Biggs With the Armed Forces 

Hicks, Lulu Margaret (Mrs. Francis E. Carroll) 

The Dalles, Oregon 

Hicks, Martha Louise Jackson, Tenn. 

Mitchell, Howard Henderson, Tenn. 

Moore, William Clifton Jackson, Tenn. 

Nabor, James Luther, Jr Belmont, Miss. 

Porter, Ira Ford With the Armed Forces 

Pullen, Doris (Mrs. Harold Welsh) Portageville, Mo. 



LAMBUTH COLLEGE 63 

Spain, Joseph Thomas Jackson, Tenn 

Steele, William Graves Jackson, Tenn. 

Swift, Eleanor Louise (Mrs. John West) Nashville, Tenn. 

Williams, Harry Eugene Barlow, Ky. 

Williams, Roy D Mayfield, Ky. 

Winslow, William R Jackson, Tenn. 

Class of 1937 
Bachelor of Arts 

Bagby, Charles Lee With the Armed Forces 

Chronister, Borden S Raleigh, N. C. 

DeShazo, Lanier Vincent Rutherford, Tenn. 

Gowan, Robbie (Mrs. John T. Masterson) 

Jackson Heights, N. Y. 

Jackson, Imogene Baldwin, Miss. 

Jones, Kathryn Humboldt, Tenn. 

Kincannon, Lou Nell (Mrs. J. D. Barton) Jackson, Tenn. 

King, Harvey, Jr Obion, Tenn. 

Lantrip, James William Smyrna, Tenn. 

Lassiter, Betty (Mrs. Roy Bengel) Birmingham, Ala. 

McCallum, Katherine (Mrs. William Winslow). ..Jackson, Tenn. 

Mainord, William Horace, Jr Memphis, Tenn. 

Manley, Gladys LaVergne (Mrs. Howard Mclntyre) 

Jackson, Tenn. 

Mattox, Milton Amory, Miss. 

Parr, James E., Jr With the Armed Forces 

Ray, G-ardner Bartlesville, Okla. 

Robbins, Thomas Ennis Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Sullivan, Charles Curtis Jackson, Tenn. 

Sutherland, Merrydale (Mrs. Hunter Woods) St. Charles, La. 

Thomas, Jacob Edwin Jackson, Tenn. 

Turner, Wylie E., Jr Piggot, Ark. 

Walkup, Faye Bridges (Mrs. E. E.) Lobelville, Tenn. 

Waynick, Ella Kathryn (Mrs. William Woolfolk) 

Jackson, Tenn. 
Womack, Richard E., Jr Lynchburg, Tenn. 

Class of 1938 
Bachelor of Arts 

Alexander, Mary Lucile Jackson, Tenn. 

Brittain, Edna Claire (Mrs. Lynn Busselle) Jackson, Tenn. 

Burkett, Herman J Jackson, Tenn. 

Burnette, Juanita Onarine (Mrs. William J. Long) 

Williston, Tenn. 

Burnette, Lillian Maxine .Williston, Tenn. 

Butler, Charles Vann Nashville, Tenn. 



64 CATALOGUE OF 



Crump,* Gladys Memphis, Tenn. 

DeShazo, Mavis Evelyn (Mrs. E. L. Jordon) Cleveland, Ohio 

Dew, Jimmie Jackson, Tenn. 

Doty, T. W., Jr Paris, Tenn. 

England, James Lawson With the Armed Forces 

Fisher, Margaret (Mrs. Leslie McKee) Memphis, Tenn. 

Garrett, Thomas Warren Murfreesboro, Tenn. 

Graves, Golden Esther (Mrs. Marcus Gurley) Paducah, Ky. 

Gurley, Marcus Monroe Paducah, Ky. 

Hammond, Raymond Charles Jackson, Tenn. 

Harris, Sarah Elizabeth Jackson, Tenn. 

Raskins, Dorothy Louise (Mrs. James P. Aderhold) 

San Antonio, Texas 

Johnston, Frances Louise (Mrs. J. S. Morris) 

West Memphis, Ark. 

Jones, Nelson Theo Jackson, Tenn. 

McDaniel, E. F., Jr With the Armed Forces 

Mainord, Rebekah (Mrs. John Harleston, Jr.) Jackson, Tenn. 

*Martin, Estelle (Mrs. W. S. Vander Wal) 

Mischke, Vernon Nashville, Tenn. 

Morris, John -Samuel West Memphis, Ark. 

Nethery, Janice (Mrs. Cecil Stone) Humboldt, Tenn. 

Parham, James With the Armed Forces 

Porter, Annie Laurie (Mrs. C. C. James) Humboldt, Tenn. 

Pullen, Mary Bob Big Creek, Miss. 

Roebke, Mary Frances Rienzi, Miss. 

Sawyer, Robert Lee Jackson, Tenn. 

Sharp, Caroline Jackson, Tenn. 

Stalvey, Daisy (Mrs. Joseph W. Brown) Whiteville, N. C. 

Swift, Mar j orie Ann E vanst on, 111. 

Thomas, Walter Y., Jr Jackson, Tenn. 

Todd, Nelwyn Frances (Mrs. Ira Porter) Medina, Tenn. 

Watlington, Kenneth Jackson, Tenn. 

Webb, Pat With the Armed Forces 

Wilson, Ruby Mae Jackson, Tenn. 

Bachelor of Science in Commerce 
Miller, Archie Earl With the Armed Forces 



Class of 1939 

Bachelor of Arts 

Birchett, Dorothy Louise (Mrs. T. E. Midyett) Jackson, Tenn. 

Bland, William Griffin Memphis, Tenn. 

Bonner, Mabel (Mrs. R. E. Womack, Jr.) Jackson, Tenn. 

Crowe, Mary Elizabeth (Mrs. Porter Jones) Memphis, Tenn. 

♦Deceased. 



LAMBUTH COLLEGE 65 

Dike, Dorothy Adelaide (Mrs. Frank Elliott) 

Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Dodds, Oscar With the Armed Forces 

Graves, Lucy Long (Mrs. Howard Graves) Humboldt, Tenn. 

Hays, Will Evelyn (Mrs. Neil Sherrod) Alamo, Tenn. 

Hilliard, Mary Arthur (Mrs. Robert Fabian Parish) 

New Orleans, La. 

Johns, Homer E Paducah, Ky. 

Lassiter, Mary D. (Mrs. Floyd Mathews) Jackson, Tenn. 

Phelps, Charles Gilbert, Jr Old Hickory, Tenn. 

Reynolds, Violet Marie (Mrs. Paul Dickerson) Corinth, Miss. 

Sawyer, Martha Frances (Mrs. Borden Chronister) 

Raleigh, N. C. 

Shorten, Paul Frederick, Jr With the Armed Forces 

Smith, Walter Rhea Dallas, Texas 

Tillman, Harold Wade 1 San Augustine, Texas 

Walkup, Elbert E Lobelville, Tenn. 

Wallick, Thelma Virginia Jackson, Tenn. 

Bachelor of Science in Commerce 
Hawkins, Barbara Ruth (Mrs. Joe Daniels) Memphis, Tenn. 

Class of 1940 

Bachelor of Arts 

Allen, Alice (Mrs. R. E. Honnall, Jr.) Jackson, Tenn. 

Bivens, Raymond Artie Grand Junction, Tenn. 

Blancett, Sue Katheryn (Mrs. William Pounds). ..Jackson, Tenn. 

Brown, Susie Henning (Mrs. Raymond K. Lasley) 

Jackson, Tenn. 

Brown, T. C Parsons, Tenn. 

Coble, Frank Parsons, Tenn. 

Dees, Fannie Mae Nashville, Tenn. 

Estes, Harry Horace Humboldt, Tenn. 

Hall, Robert Wilson With the Armed Forces 

Lett, Harlan Jerome ■. Knoxville, Tenn. 

Luter, Harriet Laredo, Texas 

Mitchell, Miles Coffman Memphis, Tenn. 

O'Neal, Mary Catherine (Mrs. Marshall Bools)... Jackson, Tenn. 

Phillips, Margaret E. (Mrs. Woody Jones) New York, N. Y. 

Reynolds, Marylee „ Jackson, Tenn. 

Scott, Bettye Margaret - Bemis, Tenn. 

Wilbur, Willard Henry _ With the Armed Forces 

Wilds, Lewell (Mrs. Lewell Lee) Miehie, Tenn. 

Wilson, Lucy Mary (Mrs. Archie T. Deem) Arlington, Va. 

Womack, Edith Lynn (Mrs. Chester Bates) Cincinnati, Ohio 

Bachelor of Science in Commerce 
Babb, Angelyn (Mrs. Wilson Jobe) Corinth, Miss. 



66 CATALOGUE OF 



"English, Mattie Virginia (Mrs. William A. Wilkens) 

Fisher, Charlotte Gertrude (Mrs. John McKinstry)... Miami, Fla. 

Flack, Mae Aileen (Mrs. William Leftwich) Cookeville, Tenn. 

* White, Bob 

Wilbur, Willard Henry With the Armed Forces 

Class of 1941 
Bachelor of Arts 

Akin, Montine Ripley, Tenn. 

Batts, Loice With the Armed Forces 

Bivens, Juanita (Mrs. Artie Bivens) Grand Junction, Tenn. 

Bond, Mary Frances (Mrs. Tommy Ballard) Jackson, Tenn. 

Clemons, Frances (Mrs. Warren D. Johnson) Jackson, Tenn. 

Cosner, Charles With the Armed Forces 

Duncan, Berry Jackson With the Armed Forces 

Greathouse, William Marvin Nashville, Tenn. 

Heaberg, James Hugh With the Armed Forces 

Kelley, Webster With the Armed Forces 

Parker, Andrew Samuel ...Paducah, Ky. 

Peters, Rachel Jane Roanoke, Va. 

Presley, Margaret Allene Sardis, Tenn. 

Ramer, Lloyd With the Armed Forces 

Ramsey, Mary M Kenton, Tenn. 

Rawls, Annie Belle (Mrs. Enos Thurmond) Bemis, Tenn. 

Sanders, Irvin R Radford, Va. 

Steele, Robbie (Mrs. John Fly) Jackson, Tenn. 

Thomas, Mary Lou Jackson. Tenn. 

Underwood, Imogene (Mrs. Lloyd Ramer) Paducah, Ky. 

Bachelor of Science in Commerce 

Bell, Margaret Carolyn (Mrs. E. F. McDaniel, Jr.) 

Bemis, Tenn. 

Fisher, Viola Frances (Mrs. Hugh Heaberg) Memphis, Tenn. 

Tomlinson, James - Jackson, Tenn. 

Class of 1942 
Bachelor of Arts 

Anderson, Denver Woodroe Medina, Tenn. 

Andrews, Janie Bess (Mrs. John C. Cox) Paris, Tenn. 

Cameron, Julian Rogers Leakesville, Miss. 

Clement, Rex Thomas With the Armed Forces 

Freeland, Joe Lawrence Allensville, Ky. 

Harris, Clarence Rowland Jackson, Tenn. 

Harrison, Thomas Marshall Jackson, Tenn. 

Langdon, James Beldon Somerville, Tenn. 

♦Deceased. 



LAMBUTH COLLEGE 67 

McClannahan, Sara Jane Jackson, Tenn. 

McRae, Mary Winifred (Mrs. J. V. Turnage) Grenada, Miss. 

Miller, Harry New York, N. Y. 

Phelps, Kenneth Jackson Nashville, Tenn. 

Powell, E. Quinton Jackson, Tenn. 

Rice, Milton Paul With the Armed Forces 

Richardson, Helen (Mrs. W. M. Spicer) Memphis, Tenn. 

Smith, Frances Jackson, Tenn. 

Spicer, William Mather Memphis, Tenn. 

Steadman, Mrs. J. R Selmer, Tenn. 

Walton, Howard Charles Muskogee, Okla. 

Warren, Mildred Louise Dyersburg, Tenn. 

Westover, Sarah Derel (Mrs. Harry Knox) Atlanta, Ga. 

Bachelor of Science 

Abrams, Charles Frederick With the Armed Forces 

Bridges, Nancy Lucile (Mrs. James Taylor) Jackson, Tenn. 

Conger, Mary Catherine (Mrs. Harry Miller) New York, N. Y. 

Gallagher, William James Batavia, N. Y. 

Harris, Mildred Adams Jackson, Tenn. 

Sansom, Louis Memphis, Tenn. 

Vetrano, Edward N With the Armed Forces 

Warlick, Eugene Jackson, Tenn. 

Williams, Margaret Maxine Philippine Islands 

Class of 1943 

Bachelor of Arts 

Bishop, Virginia Covington, Tenn. 

Bland, Anna Nell Nashville, Tenn. 

Emerson, 0. B Nashville, Tenn. 

Exum, Billie Pearson Oxford, Miss. 

Flack, James Christy With the Armed Forces 

Goddard, Annie Kathryn Winchester, Tenn. 

Martin, Mary Nelle Nashville, Tenn. 

Mattox, Evelyn Gertrude (Mrs. Robert Love) Jackson, Tenn. 

MacMillan, Alexander Malcolm Memphis, Tenn. 

McNeil, Susie Elizabeth (Mrs. Horace Mainord) 

Memphis, Tenn. 

Nail, Willette (Mrs. Robert H. Kuhlman) Medina, Tenn. 

Nance, W. A With the Armed Forces 

Nichols, Harold Jackson, Tenn. 

Parker, Carolyn Tanner Paducah, Ky. 

Pope, Margaret Evelyn ., Jackson, Tenn. 

Rawls, Evelyn (Mrs. Roger Menzies) Bemis, Tenn. 

Reynolds, Margaret Katherine Kissimee, Fla. 

Simmons, June Ruth Jackson, Tenn. 

Smith, Carl Vernon „ Jackson, Tenn. 



CATALOGUE OF 



Snipes, David Franklin With the Armed Forces 

Teer, George Arthur, Jr Jackson, Tenn. 

Yarbro, Claude Lee With the Armed Forces 

Bachelor of Science 

Archer, James Paul With the Armed Forces 

Bland Anna Nell Nashville, Tenn. 

Brooks, Mildred (Mrs. Clyde Reed) Tampa, Fla. 

Exum, Billie Pearson Oxford, Miss. 

Flack, James Christy With the Armed Forces 

G-oddard, Annie Kathryn Winchester, Tenn. 

Hilliard, Frances (Mrs. Fred Budde) Jackson, Tenn. 

MacMillan, Alexander Malcolm Memphis, Tenn. 

Nance, W. A With the Armed Forces 

Palmer, Gwendolyn Rosetta Crocker, Mo. 

Rawls, Evelyn (Mrs. Roger Menzies) Bemis, Tenn. 

Simmons, June Ruth Jackson, Tenn. 

Wasson, Mildred Love (Mrs. Wm. McWhirter) 

Johnson City, N. Y. 

Class of 1944 
Bachelor of Arts 

Davis, Martha Deborah iSomerville, Tenn. 

Dillon, Linda Marietta (Mrs. William R. Austin) 

Lexington, Tenn. 

Elkins, Carl Lee Nolensville, Tenn. 

Gallagher, Nell Foust (Mrs. W. J. Gallagher) Batavia, N. Y. 

Leeper, Elizabeth Anne (Mrs. J. C. Good) Washington, D. C. 

Robbins, Martha Frances Jackson, Tenn. 

Russell, Henry Ewell Dallas, Texas 

Smith, Nancy Rebecca Jackson, Tenn. 

Bachelor of Science 

Halford, Guy Middleton, Tenn. 

Leeper, Elizabeth Anne (Mrs. J. C. Good) Washington, D. C. 

Tate, Mary Elizabeth Lobelville, Tenn. 

Warmath, Mrs. Louise Mathis Humboldt, Tenn. 

Class of 1945 
Bachelor of Arts 

Bagby, James Lee Whitehaven, Tenn. 

Blacknall, John Neal Memphis, Tenn. 

Boulton, Jimmie Ruth Jackson, Tenn. 

Bumpus, Virginia Lee (Mrs. Frank Fletcher) 

Brownsville, Tenn. 

Daniel, Martha Elizabeth Jackson, Tenn. 

Davidson, Tom Allen Louisville, Ky. 



LAMBUTH COLLEGE 69 



England, Mary Belle Oak Ridge, Tenn. 

Johnson, Clarence Brown With the Armed Forces 

Johnson, Ira Thomas Nashville, Tenn. 

Johnson, Coleen Jolley Nashville, Tenn. 

McCullough, Jack Alfred Lexington, Ky. 

McKinnon, Eloise New Orleans, La. 

Thomas, Claude Bledsoe With the Armed Forces 

Bachelor of Science 

Austin, William Robert With the Armed Forces 

Blacknall, Marjorie Edwards Memphis, Tenn. 

Blalock, Jerelia Frances Mayfield, Ky. 

Boulton, Jimmie Ruth Jackson, Tenn. 

Farrow, Lawrence Franklin With the Armed Forces 

Pearigen, Bernice Nashville, Tenn. 

Sheffield, Mary Kincaid Paducah, Ky. 

Stewart, Charles Edward Mercer, Tenn. 



INDEX 



Page 

Absence _2 1 

Advanced Standing 20 

Aims 10-11 

Alumni Directory 58-69 

Athletics 23 

Awards 18 

Biology ....3 1 

Board of Trustees 5 

Board in Dormitory.. 14 

Boarding Places 23 

Buildings 1 1 

Business Administration 32-34 

Calendar 2 

Campus 1 1 

Chapel Attendance 22 

Chemistry _47 

Church Attendance 22 

Classification of Students. .20 

Clothing 39 

Committees of Faculty.. 9 

Departments of Instruction... 31 

Diploma Fee 1 3 

Discipline 23 

Dormitory Regulations 23 

Economics 49 

Education and Psychology 34-36 

English _.37 

Entrance Requirements 27 

Equipment 12 

Examinations 22 

Executive Committee 5 

Expenses 12 

Faculty and Officers 6, 7, 8, 9 

Foods 38 

French 40 

Grading 20 

Graduation, Requirements for.,27 
German 4 1 

History 37, 38 

History of Institution 10 

Home Economics 38, 39 

Incidentals 15 

Laboratories ....26 

Laboratory Fees _ 13, 14 

Lambuth Vision 26 

Lantern 26 



Library 

Location 

Loan Funds 



Page 

..25 

11 

16 



Maintenance Fee 13 

Mathematics 39, 40 

Music ..42-46 

Number of Hours Permitted.... 21 

Philosophy 46 

Physical Education _47 

Physical Science 47 

Physics 48 

Piano .42 

Political Science 50 

Pre-Professional Courses 29, 30 

Pre-Engineering Course 30 

Pre-Law Course 30 

Pre-Medical Course 29 

Probation 2 1 

Psychology 34 

Quality Credits 20 

Register of Students 52-57 

Registration 1 9 

Regulations Regarding 

Payments 15 

Regulations Relating to 

Students 19 

Religion 48 

Reports 20 

S cholar ships 1 7 

Self-Help 16 

Social Science.. 49-5 1 

Sociology 50 

Spanish 4 1 

Statement of High School 

Work 19 

Student Activities 2 1 

Student Body Association 24 

Student Counseling 2 6 

Student Organizations 24 

Student Publications -26 

Students, Register of 52-57 

Summary of Enrollment. 58 

Table of Contents _ 3, 4 

Teacher Training Course... .28, 29 

Transcript of Record 22 

Tuition 12 

Voice 46